Books, Writing

01/11/2013

Art Futura 2013: Feeding The Web

The Art Futura Art and Digital Culture Festival presents this year’s edition under the title “Feeding The Web”. I have written two texts for the catalogue, the first one is a reflection about our current interaction with the web as a relationship of interdependence. The second one explores the work of Japanese artist Sachiko Kodama.

Both texts can be found in English in the PDF embedded above. Translated from Spanish by Art Futura.

SHARING BY DEFAULT

Pau Waelder

Each day, we turn on our mobile devices and connect to the Internet to check our email, learn about the weather forecast, send our instant messages, read the news, watch videos or
access a social network. Usually, this interaction with the Web is perceived as receiving information, something that is obtained from external sources and in which we are involved to the extent that each person wishes to comment or share something.

But what actually happens is a continuous exchange of data between the user device and a huge set of servers and databases. Through our daily actions, we feed the Web with new data, whether generating content (photos, comments, videos, links) or by leaving behind tracks on the websites we visit through the many applications in our digital devices (browser’s text, IP address, date and time of access, application usage and so on). Thus, not only we extract information from the Web, but continually we make contributions (voluntarily and unvoluntarily) to the flow of data circulating globally. This feedback process means that, in a way, the more we learn thanks to the Web, the more the Web knows about us.

This data exchange does nothing but accelerate. According to Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook, the tendency to share content on social networks is growing exponentially, in a similar way to the development of the microprocessors that predicted the famous Moore’s Law [1]. While Zuckerberg ‘s prediction might be exaggerated (since it assumes that, in ten years, users would share 1,024 times more content than right now), it confirms the consolidation of the Web 2.0, announced in 2004 by Tim O’Reilly and celebrated by TIME magazine by naming the Internet user as person of the Year in 2006 [2].

More than a decade after the popularization of blogs, the Web has acquired an important role in industrial societies, mainly thanks to the contributions of users. Back in 2009, Jeff Howe pointed out that the content generated by consumers came to rival the entertainment industry itself, whose future would belong (at least partly) to the users [3].

Today, the scope of what is shared on the Web goes far beyond. From governments, large corporations and media conglomerates to independent professionals and idle teenagers, all sectors of society have been affected by the existence of an information exchange network in which anyone can participate. Whether it’s the Arab Spring, Wikileaks, Edward Snowden, Ai Wei Wei or the Harlem Shake, the Web now offers the possibility to amplify the ideas and actions of any individual or small group of people to a global level, with consequences that we are unable to predict yet. From this perspective, we have a communication channel that allows any user an unprecedented freedom of expression and capacity of actions.

At the same time, according to Boris Groys: ‘Internet is essentially a monitoring machine, that divides the data stream in small operations that can be tracked and inverted, monitoring each user in a real or potential manner. Internet creates a field of visibility, accessibility and complete transparency’ [4]. Each query in Google is recorded, every interaction on Facebook is stored. Every tweet, link, photo or text is stored in a remote server. The opinions, tastes, desires and the geographical location of the users are collected patiently by a series of large companies that consider such data their private property and that compete between them by offering attractive products, that house all the possible content, inviting the users to share more and more.

Zuckerberg ‘s prediction therefore answers to the obvious interest of his business in seeing an exponential increase in profits, based on the data they obtain from the users. From this
perspective, the Web 2.0 is also like a continuous marketing survey on consumer habits and our use of the social networks. And the way in which these networks provide us an environment to share content with friends, in exchange for storing our data, resembles the dystopia narrated in the film The Matrix (Andy and Lana Wachowski, 1999), in which humans live in a consensual hallucination while supplying electricity generated by their bodies to the machines.

The Web is configured simultaneously as a panopticon and temporary autonomous zone, a cathedral and a bazaar. In this dichotomy between freedom and control a continuous
confrontation is waged between governments and citizens, media and spectators, producers and consumers, service providers and users. To access the Web involves participating,
in one way or another, in this unresolved, and possibly unsolvable, conflict.

Because, in fact, we can not stop feeding the Web. We are consumers, not only of manufactured products but also of content. Content created by othets, but also prcvided by ourselves while going through the responses. To exist in the network, as indicated by Geert Lovink, means to show ourselves [5]: to generate content, to provide data, to feed the cycle of creation and circulation of any information, either banal or transcendent. By nurturing these databases, the user increases the value of the companies services, offered apparently for free, and allows them to know more about him and provide him with what {he thinks) he needs. The user also increases his self-esteem, and
strengthens his ego by the feeling of belonging to a group and sharing a collective effort. In short, he sees his live reflected on the screen.

Sharing is thus a conscious act, but not always a choice. Both on the technical, business or personal level, the Web is based on data exchange, so by the mere fact of being connected, each individual is providing information about himself, his location or his actions. The economic benefit obtained by big business and the personal benefit obtained by the users makes it increasingly more desirable and inevitable to share content and information. “Zuckerberg’s Law” thus becomes a vicious circle, as defined by Andrew Keen, who criticizes the tendency to share everything that can lead to a loss of individual freedom and the loss of contact with our environment [6]. At the same time, staying connected is no longer an option.

As indicated by Alex Galloway, “the Web requires the user to be online and available at all times, or to be offline but also available” [7]. Our daily life is developed equally in a physical environment and In the data flow of 1he Web. There is not a •cyberspace•, separate from the real world: the world we live in penetrates, nourishes and defines the data network as a reflection of our everyday lives and our fantasies, what we have and what we wish.

If the Web is part of our everyday life, our interactions with the data stream can not be considered as a solo act. There is no option to stay out or limit ourselves to obtain information, all we do is shared by default with the Web itself. If this is something that we should fear or desire, we can not say with certainty yet. In any case, we are immersed in a process from which we can not, or do not want, to detach ourselves. Feeding the Web, we feed ourselves in a relationship of mutual dependence.

Notes:
[1] Paul Boutin, “The Law of Online Sharing”. Technology Review, 20 december 2011.
[2] Lev Grossman, “You –Yes, You- Are TIME’s Person of the Year”. TIME, 25 december 2006.
[3] Jeff Howe, Crowdsourcing. How the Power of the Crowd is Driving the Future of Business. London: Random House, 2009, 76.
[4] Boris Groys, “Art Workers_: Between Utopia and the Archive”. e-flux journal, may 2013.
[5] Geert Lovink, Networks Without s Cause. A Critique of Social Media. Cambridge: Politi Press, 2012, 13.
[6] Andrew Keen, Digital Vertigo. How today’s online social revolution is dividing, diminishing, and discrienting us. London: Constable & Robinson, 2012, 65.
[7] Alexander Galloway y Eugene Thacker, The Exploit. A Theory of Networks. Minneapolis, London: University of Minnesota Press, 2007, 126.

El festival de arte y cultura digital Art Futura se presenta este año bajo el título “Feeding The Web”. En relación con la temática de este año, he escrito dos textos para el catálogo de Art Futura. El primero reflexiona sobre nuestra interacción actual con la Red como una relación de interdependencia. El segundo explora la obra de la artista japonesa Sachiko Kodama.

COMPARTIR POR DEFECTO

Pau Waelder

Cada día, encendemos nuestros dispositivos móviles y nos conectamos a Internet para consultar el correo, conocer la predicción del tiempo, enviar mensajes instantáneos, leer las noticias, ver vídeos o acceder a alguna red social. Habitualmente, esta interacción con la Red se percibe como una recepción de información, algo que se obtiene de fuentes externas y en lo que se participa en la medida en que cada persona desea pronunciarse o compartir algo. Pero lo que se produce en realidad es un continuo intercambio de datos entre el dispositivo del usuario y un enorme conjunto de servidores y bases de datos. A través de nuestras acciones cotidianas, alimentamos la Red con nuevos datos, ya sean contenidos que hemos generado (fotos, comentarios, vídeos, enlaces) o simplemente las huellas que dejamos al visitar sitios web o emplear alguna de las muchas aplicaciones que se acumulan en nuestros dispositivos digitales (texto introducido en el navegador, dirección IP, fecha y hora de acceso, uso de la aplicación y un largo etcétera). De esta manera, no sólo extraemos información de la Red, sino que continuamente hacemos aportaciones (voluntarias e involuntarias) al flujo de datos que circula a nivel global. Este proceso de retroalimentación conlleva que, en cierto modo, cuanto más sabemos gracias a la Red, más sabe la Red acerca de nosotros.

Este intercambio de datos no hace más que acelerarse. Según Mark Zuckerberg, fundador de Facebook, la tendencia a compartir contenidos en las redes sociales está creciendo exponencialmente, de manera similar al ritmo de desarrollo de los microprocesadores que vaticinaba la conocida Ley de Moore [1]. Si bien la predicción de Zuckerberg es exagerada (puesto que supone que, en diez años, los usuarios compartirán 1.024 veces más contenidos que ahora), constata la consolidación de la web 2.0, anunciada en 2004 por Tim O’Reilly y celebrada por la revista TIME al nombrar al usuario de Internet Persona del Año en 2006 [2]. Más de una década después de la popularización de los blogs, la Red ha adquirido un papel fundamental en la sociedades industrializadas, principalmente gracias a las aportaciones de los usuarios. Ya en 2009, Jeff Howe apuntaba que los contenidos generados por los consumidores llegaban a rivalizar con la propia industria del entretenimiento, cuyo futuro sería encargado (al menos en parte) a los propios usuarios [3]. Hoy en día, el alcance de lo que se comparte en la Red va mucho más allá. Desde los gobiernos, las grandes corporaciones y los medios de comunicación hasta los profesionales independientes y los adolescentes ociosos, todos los sectores de la sociedad se han visto afectados por la existencia de una red de intercambio de información en la que cualquiera puede participar. Ya se trate de la Primavera Árabe, Wikileaks, Edward Snowden, Ai Wei Wei o el Harlem Shake, la Red ofrece ahora la posibilidad de amplificar las ideas y las acciones de un individuo o un grupo reducido de personas a nivel global, con consecuencias que aún somos incapaces de predecir. Desde esta perspectiva, disponemos de un canal de comunicación que permite a cualquier usuario una libertad de expresión y una capacidad de acción sin precedentes.

Al mismo tiempo, según Boris Groys: “Internet es, en esencia, una máquina de vigilancia. Divide el flujo de datos en pequeñas operaciones que pueden ser rastreadas e invertidas, exponiendo a cada usuario a una vigilancia, real o posible. Internet crea un campo de visibilidad, accesibilidad y transparencia total” [4]. Cada consulta en Google es registrada, cada interacción en Facebook es almacenada. Cada tuit, enlace, foto o texto se conserva en un servidor remoto. Las opiniones, los gustos, los deseos y la propia localización geográfica de los usuarios son recopilados pacientemente por una serie de grandes empresas que hacen de esos datos su propiedad privada y compiten por ellos ofreciendo productos atractivos, con los que alojan todos los contenidos que puedan suministrarles y les invitan a compartir cada vez más. La predicción de Zuckerberg responde por tanto al evidente interés que tiene su empresa en ver aumentar exponencialmente sus beneficios, derivados de los datos que obtienen de los usuarios. Desde esta perspectiva, la web 2.0 es también un gran mercado de información acerca de los hábitos de los consumidores, siendo nuestro uso de las redes sociales algo similar a un continuo sondeo de marketing. La manera en que estas redes nos ofrecen un entorno en el que compartir contenidos con amigos y familiares a cambio de almacenar nuestros datos se asemeja así a la distopía narrada en el film The Matrix (Andy y Lana Wachowski, 1999), en la que los humanos viven una alucinación consensuada mientras suministran la electricidad generada por sus cuerpos a las máquinas.

La Red se configura simultáneamente como un panóptico y una zona autónoma temporal, una catedral y un bazar. En esta dicotomía entre libertad y control se libra un enfrentamiento continuo entre gobiernos y ciudadanos, medios de comunicación y espectadores, productores y consumidores, proveedores de servicios y usuarios. Acceder a la Red implica participar, de una u otra manera, en este conflicto no resuelto, y posiblemente irresoluble. Porque, de hecho, no podemos dejar de alimentar la Red. Somos consumidores, no sólo de productos manufacturados sino también de contenidos: tanto aquellos que son creados por otros, como los que aportamos nosotros mismos y contemplamos a través de las respuestas que suscitan en los demás. Existir en la Red, como indica Geert Lovink, es mostrarse [5]: generar contenidos, aportar datos, alimentar el ciclo de creación y circulación de todo tipo de información, ya sea banal o trascendente. Al nutrir las bases de datos, el usuario aumenta el valor de las empresas que le ofrecen sus servicios de forma aparentemente gratuita, les permite conocerle mejor y suministrarle aquello que (cree que) necesita. Pero este usuario también aumenta su autoestima, al ver reforzado su ego en la sensación de pertenencia a un grupo, de participación en un esfuerzo colectivo. En suma, al ver reflejada su propia vida en la pantalla.

Compartir es así un acto consciente, pero no siempre es una elección. Tanto a nivel tecnológico como empresarial o personal, la Red se basa en un intercambio de datos, de manera que por el simple hecho de estar conectado, cada individuo está facilitando información acerca de sí mismo, de su localización o de sus acciones. El impulso del beneficio económico que obtienen las grandes empresas y el beneficio personal que obtienen los usuarios hace que cada vez sea más inevitable y a la vez deseable compartir contenidos e información propia. La “Ley de Zuckerberg” se convierte así en un círculo vicioso, como lo define Andrew Keen, quien critica que la tendencia a compartirlo todo nos puede llevar a una pérdida de libertad individual y de contacto con nuestro entorno [6]. Al mismo tiempo, estar conectado deja de ser una opción. Como indica Alex Galloway, “todos los discursos oficiales de la Web requieren que uno esté conectado y disponible, o bien desconectado pero también disponible” [7]. Nuestra vida cotidiana se desarrolla a partes iguales en un entorno físico y en el flujo de datos de la Red. No existe ya un “ciberespacio”, separado del mundo real: el mundo en que vivimos penetra, nutre y define la red de datos como un reflejo de nuestra cotidianidad y nuestras fantasías, lo que tenemos y lo que deseamos. Si la Red forma parte de nuestra vida cotidiana, nuestra interacción con el flujo de datos no puede ser ya un acto solitario. No existe la opción de mantenerse al margen o limitarse a obtener información, todo lo que hacemos se comparte, por defecto, con la propia Red. Si esto es algo que debemos temer o desear, aún no podemos afirmarlo con certeza. En cualquier caso, vivimos inmersos en un proceso del que ni queremos ni podemos desligarnos. Alimentando la Red, nos alimentamos a nosotros mismos en una relación de dependencia mutua.

Notas:

[1] Paul Boutin, “The Law of Online Sharing”. Technology Review, 20 diciembre 2011. <http://www.technologyreview.com/review/426438/the-law-of-online-sharing/>

[2] Lev Grossman, “You–Yes, You– Are TIME’s Person of the Year”. TIME, 25 diciembre 2006. <http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1570810,00.html>

[3] Jeff Howe, Crowdsourcing. How the Power of the Crowd is Driving the Future of Business. Londres: Random House, 2009, 76.

[4] Boris Groys, “Art Workers : Between Utopia and the Archive”. e-flux journal, mayo 2013. <http://www.e-flux.com/journal/art-workers-between-utopia-and-the-archive/>

[5] Geert Lovink, Networks Without a Cause. A Critique of Social Media. Cambridge: Politi Press, 2012, 13.

[6] Andrew Keen, Digital Vertigo. How today’s online social revolution is dividing, diminishing, and disorienting us. Londres: Constable & Robinson, 2012, 65.

[7] Alexander Galloway y Eugene Thacker, The Exploit. A Theory of Networks. Minneapolis, Londres: University of Minnesota Press, 2007, 126.

El festival d’art i cultura digital Art Futura es presenta aquest any sota el títol “Feeding The Web”. En relació amb la temàtica d’aquest any, he escrit dos texts per al catàleg. El primer reflexiona sobre la nostra interacció actual amb la Xarxa com una relació d’interdependència. El segon explora l’obra de l’artista japonesa Sachiko Kodama.

 

COMPARTIR POR DEFECTO

Pau Waelder

Cada día, encendemos nuestros dispositivos móviles y nos conectamos a Internet para consultar el correo, conocer la predicción del tiempo, enviar mensajes instantáneos, leer las noticias, ver vídeos o acceder a alguna red social. Habitualmente, esta interacción con la Red se percibe como una recepción de información, algo que se obtiene de fuentes externas y en lo que se participa en la medida en que cada persona desea pronunciarse o compartir algo. Pero lo que se produce en realidad es un continuo intercambio de datos entre el dispositivo del usuario y un enorme conjunto de servidores y bases de datos. A través de nuestras acciones cotidianas, alimentamos la Red con nuevos datos, ya sean contenidos que hemos generado (fotos, comentarios, vídeos, enlaces) o simplemente las huellas que dejamos al visitar sitios web o emplear alguna de las muchas aplicaciones que se acumulan en nuestros dispositivos digitales (texto introducido en el navegador, dirección IP, fecha y hora de acceso, uso de la aplicación y un largo etcétera). De esta manera, no sólo extraemos información de la Red, sino que continuamente hacemos aportaciones (voluntarias e involuntarias) al flujo de datos que circula a nivel global. Este proceso de retroalimentación conlleva que, en cierto modo, cuanto más sabemos gracias a la Red, más sabe la Red acerca de nosotros.

Este intercambio de datos no hace más que acelerarse. Según Mark Zuckerberg, fundador de Facebook, la tendencia a compartir contenidos en las redes sociales está creciendo exponencialmente, de manera similar al ritmo de desarrollo de los microprocesadores que vaticinaba la conocida Ley de Moore [1]. Si bien la predicción de Zuckerberg es exagerada (puesto que supone que, en diez años, los usuarios compartirán 1.024 veces más contenidos que ahora), constata la consolidación de la web 2.0, anunciada en 2004 por Tim O’Reilly y celebrada por la revista TIME al nombrar al usuario de Internet Persona del Año en 2006 [2]. Más de una década después de la popularización de los blogs, la Red ha adquirido un papel fundamental en la sociedades industrializadas, principalmente gracias a las aportaciones de los usuarios. Ya en 2009, Jeff Howe apuntaba que los contenidos generados por los consumidores llegaban a rivalizar con la propia industria del entretenimiento, cuyo futuro sería encargado (al menos en parte) a los propios usuarios [3]. Hoy en día, el alcance de lo que se comparte en la Red va mucho más allá. Desde los gobiernos, las grandes corporaciones y los medios de comunicación hasta los profesionales independientes y los adolescentes ociosos, todos los sectores de la sociedad se han visto afectados por la existencia de una red de intercambio de información en la que cualquiera puede participar. Ya se trate de la Primavera Árabe, Wikileaks, Edward Snowden, Ai Wei Wei o el Harlem Shake, la Red ofrece ahora la posibilidad de amplificar las ideas y las acciones de un individuo o un grupo reducido de personas a nivel global, con consecuencias que aún somos incapaces de predecir. Desde esta perspectiva, disponemos de un canal de comunicación que permite a cualquier usuario una libertad de expresión y una capacidad de acción sin precedentes.

Al mismo tiempo, según Boris Groys: “Internet es, en esencia, una máquina de vigilancia. Divide el flujo de datos en pequeñas operaciones que pueden ser rastreadas e invertidas, exponiendo a cada usuario a una vigilancia, real o posible. Internet crea un campo de visibilidad, accesibilidad y transparencia total” [4]. Cada consulta en Google es registrada, cada interacción en Facebook es almacenada. Cada tuit, enlace, foto o texto se conserva en un servidor remoto. Las opiniones, los gustos, los deseos y la propia localización geográfica de los usuarios son recopilados pacientemente por una serie de grandes empresas que hacen de esos datos su propiedad privada y compiten por ellos ofreciendo productos atractivos, con los que alojan todos los contenidos que puedan suministrarles y les invitan a compartir cada vez más. La predicción de Zuckerberg responde por tanto al evidente interés que tiene su empresa en ver aumentar exponencialmente sus beneficios, derivados de los datos que obtienen de los usuarios. Desde esta perspectiva, la web 2.0 es también un gran mercado de información acerca de los hábitos de los consumidores, siendo nuestro uso de las redes sociales algo similar a un continuo sondeo de marketing. La manera en que estas redes nos ofrecen un entorno en el que compartir contenidos con amigos y familiares a cambio de almacenar nuestros datos se asemeja así a la distopía narrada en el film The Matrix (Andy y Lana Wachowski, 1999), en la que los humanos viven una alucinación consensuada mientras suministran la electricidad generada por sus cuerpos a las máquinas.

La Red se configura simultáneamente como un panóptico y una zona autónoma temporal, una catedral y un bazar. En esta dicotomía entre libertad y control se libra un enfrentamiento continuo entre gobiernos y ciudadanos, medios de comunicación y espectadores, productores y consumidores, proveedores de servicios y usuarios. Acceder a la Red implica participar, de una u otra manera, en este conflicto no resuelto, y posiblemente irresoluble. Porque, de hecho, no podemos dejar de alimentar la Red. Somos consumidores, no sólo de productos manufacturados sino también de contenidos: tanto aquellos que son creados por otros, como los que aportamos nosotros mismos y contemplamos a través de las respuestas que suscitan en los demás. Existir en la Red, como indica Geert Lovink, es mostrarse [5]: generar contenidos, aportar datos, alimentar el ciclo de creación y circulación de todo tipo de información, ya sea banal o trascendente. Al nutrir las bases de datos, el usuario aumenta el valor de las empresas que le ofrecen sus servicios de forma aparentemente gratuita, les permite conocerle mejor y suministrarle aquello que (cree que) necesita. Pero este usuario también aumenta su autoestima, al ver reforzado su ego en la sensación de pertenencia a un grupo, de participación en un esfuerzo colectivo. En suma, al ver reflejada su propia vida en la pantalla.

Compartir es así un acto consciente, pero no siempre es una elección. Tanto a nivel tecnológico como empresarial o personal, la Red se basa en un intercambio de datos, de manera que por el simple hecho de estar conectado, cada individuo está facilitando información acerca de sí mismo, de su localización o de sus acciones. El impulso del beneficio económico que obtienen las grandes empresas y el beneficio personal que obtienen los usuarios hace que cada vez sea más inevitable y a la vez deseable compartir contenidos e información propia. La “Ley de Zuckerberg” se convierte así en un círculo vicioso, como lo define Andrew Keen, quien critica que la tendencia a compartirlo todo nos puede llevar a una pérdida de libertad individual y de contacto con nuestro entorno [6]. Al mismo tiempo, estar conectado deja de ser una opción. Como indica Alex Galloway, “todos los discursos oficiales de la Web requieren que uno esté conectado y disponible, o bien desconectado pero también disponible” [7]. Nuestra vida cotidiana se desarrolla a partes iguales en un entorno físico y en el flujo de datos de la Red. No existe ya un “ciberespacio”, separado del mundo real: el mundo en que vivimos penetra, nutre y define la red de datos como un reflejo de nuestra cotidianidad y nuestras fantasías, lo que tenemos y lo que deseamos. Si la Red forma parte de nuestra vida cotidiana, nuestra interacción con el flujo de datos no puede ser ya un acto solitario. No existe la opción de mantenerse al margen o limitarse a obtener información, todo lo que hacemos se comparte, por defecto, con la propia Red. Si esto es algo que debemos temer o desear, aún no podemos afirmarlo con certeza. En cualquier caso, vivimos inmersos en un proceso del que ni queremos ni podemos desligarnos. Alimentando la Red, nos alimentamos a nosotros mismos en una relación de dependencia mutua.

Notas:

[1] Paul Boutin, “The Law of Online Sharing”. Technology Review, 20 diciembre 2011.

[2] Lev Grossman, “You–Yes, You– Are TIME’s Person of the Year”. TIME, 25 diciembre 2006.

[3] Jeff Howe, Crowdsourcing. How the Power of the Crowd is Driving the Future of Business. Londres: Random House, 2009, 76.

[4] Boris Groys, “Art Workers : Between Utopia and the Archive”. e-flux journal, mayo 2013.

[5] Geert Lovink, Networks Without a Cause. A Critique of Social Media. Cambridge: Politi Press, 2012, 13.

[6] Andrew Keen, Digital Vertigo. How today’s online social revolution is dividing, diminishing, and disorienting us. Londres: Constable & Robinson, 2012, 65.

[7] Alexander Galloway y Eugene Thacker, The Exploit. A Theory of Networks. Minneapolis, Londres: University of Minnesota Press, 2007, 126.