Online, Writing

15/09/2011

Carlo Zanni’s “People from Mars” at SKL gallery

Tags: , , ,

Carlo Zanni. “People from Mars” at SKL Gallery

 

OPERA APERTA

People from Mars
Carlo Zanni
SKL Gallery

OPERA APERTA

People from Mars
Carlo Zanni
SKL Gallery

In 1962, semiotician Umberto Eco published in Milan his influential text Opera aperta, an essay that introduces the concept of “open work”, based on the example of various pieces of instrumental music of Karlheinz Stockhausen, Luciano Berio, Henri Pousseur and Pierre Boulez in which composers give considerable autonomy to the interpreter (who actually must complete the piece). Such compositions, Eco suggests, are not restricted to be only finished pieces that must be executed repeatedly, according to fixed coordinates, but maintain an open end that is left to the interpreter. The semiotician warns at the outset that his concept of “openness” of the work differs from the usual conception of the term, which sums up as follows:

“In that sense, then, a work of art, complete and closed at its perfection of body perfectly calibrated, it is also open, can be interpreted a thousand different ways without their irreproducible singularity thus be altered.” [1]

Also in Milan (and New York) the artist Carlo Zanni has developed a progressive work that has led to the creation of interactive stories, plays open in the sense offered by Eco, since within a complete and open to closed data flow in the network, involuntary intervention of the viewer, to artificial intelligence, chance and serendipity. Pieces such as Stockhausen and Berio scores must be interpreted by the performer, and in this case the programming code that is submitted to a reading that, within established parameters, is ever new. The artwork is open to be computable, subjected to a continuous process that generates different products depending on the variables that the artist has decided to integrate. It becomes, therefore, not the author of a piece but a system with multiple results, a variety of ways to capture the same idea.

But an open work is an unfinished work (and Eco tells us), but a work consisting of structural units in an unplanned system capable of being transformed by external stimuli. This system is not incidental, but part of the concept developed by the artist, and that depends on a series of conscious decisions that affect both the content and format of the work. In recent years, Carlo Zanni has decided to create this system for their work based on a concept it calls Data Cinema (film data) and that is exploring the possibilities of creating an interactive audiovisual narrative, linked to the language of film . This means that Zanni works take the form of short films, in which every detail is carefully studied (from the props, the actors and the mounting debt obligations) and develops a fragmented narrative whose interpretation depends on the viewer ( but this is not the only interaction). As films, the pieces are certainly interesting, but as I indicated earlier compositions are not just visual but interactive works.This last statement may be confusing, since the pieces do not interact with the viewer in the sense in which we are accustomed to the computer mouse or touchscreen devices. The works interact has interacted or will in the future in a manner beyond the control of the viewer, as an event that occurs generates a new instance of the work, another result of the system. Carlo Zanni parts that are now exposed in the gallery SKL are therefore open moments of works by their very nature can not be grasped in its entirety.

The Possible Ties Between Illness and Success (2006) [2] is a film of two minutes duration, performed in the Cinecittà studios with actors Stefania Orsola Garello and Ignazio Oliva. In it we see a man lying in bed, suffering from a disease that covers your skin with black spots.The melancholy music by Gabriel Yared provides the dramatic scene as the words of writer John Haskell floating in the air, announcing an end inevitable. This film, which was seen only on the Internet between 2006 and 2007, reissued each day based on the data of users who accessed the website to see it. The number of users and their countries of origin determined the position and number of spots that were added digitally to the actor’s body, so that more people viewing the film, the character was sicker. With this work, Zanni raised “possible connections between the disease and success,” how the desire for success affects the psyche of the artist and also as an observer in itself an invasive act.

My Temporary Visiting Position From The Sunset Terrace Bar (2007-2010) [3] opens with the words of the poet Ghada Samman, giving way a short excerpt from an amateur video, banal and clumsy on the terrace of a bar . The evening settles over the cityscape while playing a song by Gotan Project. The scene ends abruptly with the passage of a flock of swallows. These are all elements that symbolize various forms of migration and exile, which is also reflected in the landscape itself: while the bottom part of the town of Ahlen, Germany, the sky has taken a real-time Webcam located in Naples, Italy. Through a program, it has maintained a daily version of this film varies according to the Italian city time.

My Way Into Oblivion iterating (2010-2011) [4] shows the artist at his home, suddenly accosted by a voice-over, mechanically reciting the terms of use of YouTube, the portal that hosts this piece. The endless soliloquy takes the protagonist from boredom to despair, in a document presented as a “true story” and contains numerous references to the novel Animal Farm by George Orwell, as well as censorship and domination that maintain large corporations on users supposedly free space of the Internet. The film is automatically updated whenever you modify its YouTube terms of use, which history can be modified in the future, for all eternity, or at least for as long as YouTube and the Internet.

My Country Is a Living Room (2011) [5] is a job that separates the concept of Data Cinema but still fully consistent with the exploration of the possibilities of open work. On this occasion, Carlo Zanni has created a poem dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the unification of Italy. Following the principle of interaction with the data flows in the network, the artist has chosen to write the poem using Google Scribe, a resource of the company, which “advises” in drafting, completing words and suggesting the continuation of a sentencefrom the analysis of the frequency with which two or more words in texts published on the Internet. Thus, Zanni simply typing the first word of each verse in English, allowing the program suggest the rest in a kind of exquisite corpse computerized. The poem was created in this way himself, and has been translated into 57 languages with Google Translate machine translator. Far from being just a succession of meaningless words, the poem has proved surprisingly incisive, as evidenced by the following verses:

Mr.LivingRoom had stolen the money from the government and the private sector and public sector.
[…]
Mr.LivingRoom deceives the whole world is watching and waiting for the coming years.
[…]
My country is dying at the end of the day and night to make sure that the new system is a way to get the best of the best in the world of the living room.
I’m sure the new system is a way to get the best of the best in the world of the living room.
I am not alone in this world and the world of the living room.
Mr.LivingRoom is a great way to get the best of the best in the world of the living room.

Carlo Zanni let the world speak in his poem and edit their films, through a data stream that knows give form and content. Explore new ways to transcend the definitions of the medium, just as it seeks new ways to distribute their works. Drawing on his extensive experience in the net art and a long research on the art market, the artist is launching his latest project, People from Mars, a platform that facilitates new models of distribution and acquisition of digital artwork, issues that approach to the general public and question the conception of the work of art as a luxury for an elite. Zanni and choose to create formats that make it more accessible and allow their work can be acquired without losing quality or conceptual strength, to a wider audience. The work of art is thus, in every sense, an open work.

Pau Waelder
August, 2011

————————-
[1] Umberto Eco, open work. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984, 74.
[2] The Possible Ties Between Illness and Success (2006).<http://www.thepossibleties.com/TPT/>
[3] My Temporary Visiting Position at the Sunset Terrace Bar (2007-2010).<http://www.fromthesunsetterrace.com/>
[4] iterating My Way Into Oblivion (2010-2011). <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u55PBArez3c&hd=1>
[5] My Country Is a Living Room (2011). <http://mycountryisalivingroom.com/>

Carlo Zanni. “People from Mars” at SKL Gallery

 

OPERA APERTA

People from Mars
Carlo Zanni
Galería SKL

En 1962, el semiólogo Umberto Eco publicó en Milán su influyente texto Opera aperta, un ensayo en el que introduce el concepto de “obra abierta”, partiendo del ejemplo de diversas piezas de música instrumental de Karlheinz Stockhausen, Luciano Berio, Henri Pousseur y Pierre Boulez en las que los compositores otorgan una considerable autonomía al intérprete (quien de hecho debe completar la pieza). Dichas composiciones, indica Eco, no se limitan a ser piezas acabadas que sólo pueden ser ejecutadas de forma repetitiva, según unas coordenadas fijas, sino que mantienen una conclusión abierta que queda en manos del propio intérprete. El semiólogo advierte ante todo que su concepto de “apertura” de la obra difiere de la concepción habitual del término, que resume de la siguiente manera:

“En tal sentido, pues, una obra de arte, forma completa y cerrada en su perfección de organismo perfectamente calibrado, es asimismo abierta, posibilidad de ser interpretada de mil modos diversos sin que su irreproducible singularidad resulte por ello alterada.” [1]

También en Milán (y en Nueva York) el artista Carlo Zanni ha desarrollado una obra que progresivamente le ha llevado a la creación de narraciones interactivas, obras abiertas en el sentido ofrecido por Eco, puesto que dentro de una forma completa y cerrada se abren al flujo de datos en la Red, a la intervención involuntaria del espectador, a la inteligencia artificial, al azar y a la serendipia. Piezas que, como las partituras de Stockhausen o Berio, deben interpretadas por el ejecutante, siendo en este caso el código de programación el que se somete a una lectura que, dentro de unos parámetros establecidos, es siempre nueva. La obra de arte se hace abierta al ser computable, sometida a un proceso continuo que genera diferentes productos en función de las variables que el artista ha decidido integrar. Se convierte, así, no en autor de una pieza sino de un sistema con múltiples resultados, una gran diversidad de formas de plasmar una misma idea.

Pero una obra abierta no es una obra inacabada (ya nos lo dice Eco), sino una obra formada por unidades estructurales en un sistema no planificado, susceptible de ser transformado por estímulos externos. Este sistema no es fortuito, sino que forma parte del concepto que ha desarrollado el artista, y que depende de una serie de decisiones conscientes que afectan tanto al contenido como al formato de la obra. En los últimos años, Carlo Zanni ha decidido crear este sistema para sus obras en base a un concepto que ha denominado Data Cinema (cine de datos) y que consiste en la exploración de las posibilidades de crear una narración audiovisual interactiva, ligada al lenguaje cinematográfico. Esto quiere decir que las obras de Zanni adoptan la forma de cortometrajes, en los que cada detalle es cuidadosamente estudiado (desde el atrezzo, los actores y el montaje a los títulos de crédito) y se desarrolla una narración fragmentada cuya interpretación depende del espectador (pero no es esta la única interacción). Como films, las piezas resultan sin duda interesantes, pero como he indicado antes no son simplemente composiciones audiovisuales sino obras interactivas. Esta última afirmación puede resultar confusa, puesto que las piezas no interactúan con el espectador en el sentido en el que nos tienen habituados el ratón del ordenador o los dispositivos táctiles. Las obras interactúan, han interactuado o lo harán en el futuro de una forma ajena al control del espectador, como un evento que al producirse genera una nueva instancia de la obra, un resultado más del sistema. Las piezas de Carlo Zanni que ahora se exponen en la galería SKL son, por tanto, instantes de unas obras abiertas que por su propia naturaleza no pueden captarse en su totalidad.

The Possible Ties Between Illness and Success (2006) [2] es un film de dos minutos de duración, realizado en los estudios de Cinecittà con los actores Stefania Orsola Garello e Ignazio Oliva. En él vemos a un hombre que yace en la cama, afectado de una enfermedad que cubre su piel con manchas negras. La meláncólica música de Gabriel Yared dota a la escena de dramatismo, mientras las palabras del escritor John Haskell flotan en el aire, anunciando un fin inevitable. Esta película, que pudo verse exclusivamente en Internet entre 2006 y 2007, se reeditaba cada día en función de los datos de los usuarios que accedían al sitio web para verla. El número de usuarios y sus países de procedencia determinaban la posición y el número de manchas que se añadían digitalmente al cuerpo del actor, de manera que cuanta más gente visionaba el film, más enfermo estaba el personaje. Con esta obra, Zanni planteaba “las posibles conexiones entre la enfermedad y el éxito”, de qué manera el deseo de éxito afecta a la psique del artista y también cómo observar en en sí un acto invasivo.

My Temporary Visiting Position From the Sunset Terrace Bar (2007-2010) [3] se abre con las palabras de la poetisa Ghada Samman, que dan paso un breve fragmento de un vídeo de aficionado, banal y torpe, en la terraza de un bar. La tarde se posa sobre el paisaje urbano mientras suena una canción del grupo Gotan Project. La escena termina de forma abrupta con el paso de una bandada de golondrinas. Todos estos son elementos que simbolizan de diversas formas la migración y el exilio, algo que se hace patente también en el propio paisaje: mientras la parte inferior pertenece a la ciudad de Ahlen, en Alemania, el cielo se ha extraído en tiempo real de una webcam situada en Nápoles, Italia. Por medio de un programa, se ha conservado una versión diaria de este film, variable en función del tiempo de la ciudad italiana.

Iterating My Way Into Oblivion (2010-2011) [4] nos muestra al artista en su domicilio, súbitamente interpelado por una voz en off, que recita mecánicamente los términos de uso de YouTube, el portal en el que se aloja esta pieza. El interminable soliloquio lleva al protagonista del aburrimiento a la desesperación, en un documento que se presenta como una “historia real” y que contiene numerosas referencias a la novela Rebelión en la granja de George Orwell, así como a la censura y la dominación que mantienen las grandes corporaciones sobre los usuarios en el espacio supuestamente libre que es Internet. El film se actualiza automáticamente cada vez que YouTube modifica sus términos de uso, con lo cual la historia puede verse modificada en el futuro, durante toda la eternidad, o al menos mientras existan YouTube e Internet.

My Country Is a Living Room (2011) [5] es un trabajo que se separa del concepto de Data Cinema pero continúa con total coherencia la exploración de las posibilidades de la obra abierta. En esta ocasión, Carlo Zanni ha creado un poema dedicado a la celebración del 150 aniversario de la unificación de Italia. Siguiendo el principio de interacción con los flujos de datos en la Red, el artista ha optado por escribir el poema empleando Google Scribe, un recurso de la empresa estadounidense que “asesora” en la redacción de textos completando palabras y sugiriendo la continuación de una frase a partir del análisis de la frecuencia con la que dos o más palabras aparecen en los textos publicados en Internet. De esta manera, Zanni se limitó a escribir las primeras palabras de cada verso en inglés, dejando que el programa sugiriese el resto, en una especie de cadáver exquisito informatizado. El poema se creó de esta manera a sí mismo, y ha sido traducido a 57 idiomas con el traductor automático Google Translate. Lejos de ser una simple sucesión de palabras sin sentido, el poema ha resultado ser sorprendentemente incisivo, como demuestran los siguientes versos:

Mr.LivingRoom había robado el dinero del gobierno y el sector privado y el sector público.

[…]

Mr.LivingRoom engaña al mundo entero está observando y esperando para los próximos años.

[…]

Mi país se muere en el final del día y la noche para asegurarse de que el nuevo sistema es una manera de obtener lo mejor de lo mejor en el mundo de la sala de estar.

Estoy seguro de que el nuevo sistema es una manera de obtener lo mejor de lo mejor en el mundo de la sala de estar.

No estoy solo en este mundo y el mundo de la sala de estar.

Mr.LivingRoom es una gran manera de obtener lo mejor de lo mejor en el mundo de la sala de estar.

Carlo Zanni deja que el mundo hable en su poema y modifique sus cortometrajes, a través de un flujo de datos al que sabe dotar de forma y contenido. Explora nuevas formas de trascender las definiciones del medio, de la misma manera en que busca nuevos caminos para la distribución de sus obras. Partiendo de su extensa experiencia en el net art y una larga investigación acerca del mercado del arte, el artista lanza ahora su último proyecto, People from Mars, una plataforma que facilita nuevos modelos de distribución y adquisición de piezas de arte digital, ediciones que se acercan al público general y cuestionan la concepción de la obra de arte como un objeto de lujo para una élite. Zanni opta así por crear formatos que hacen más accesible su trabajo y permiten que pueda ser adquirido, sin perder su calidad ni fuerza conceptual, a un público más amplio. La obra de arte es de esta manera, y en todos los sentidos, una obra abierta.

Pau Waelder

Agosto, 2011

————————-

[1] Umberto Eco, Obra abierta. Barcelona: Editorial Ariel, 1984, 74.

[2] The Possible Ties Between Illness and Success (2006). <http://www.thepossibleties.com/TPT/>

[3] My Temporary Visiting Position at the Sunset Terrace Bar (2007-2010). <http://www.fromthesunsetterrace.com/>

[4] Iterating My Way Into Oblivion (2010-2011). <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u55PBArez3c&hd=1>

[5] My Country Is a Living Room (2011). <http://mycountryisalivingroom.com/>

Texto escrito para la exposición “People from Mars” de Carlo Zanni, en la galería SKL de Palma (Mallorca, España). Septiembre de 2011.


Text escrit en castellà per a l’exposició de Carlo Zanni “People from Mars” a la galeria SKL
 

OPERA APERTA

People from Mars
Carlo Zanni
Galería SKL

 

En 1962, el semiólogo Umberto Eco publicó en Milán su influyente texto Opera aperta, un ensayo en el que introduce el concepto de “obra abierta”, partiendo del ejemplo de diversas piezas de música instrumental de Karlheinz Stockhausen, Luciano Berio, Henri Pousseur y Pierre Boulez en las que los compositores otorgan una considerable autonomía al intérprete (quien de hecho debe completar la pieza). Dichas composiciones, indica Eco, no se limitan a ser piezas acabadas que sólo pueden ser ejecutadas de forma repetitiva, según unas coordenadas fijas, sino que mantienen una conclusión abierta que queda en manos del propio intérprete. El semiólogo advierte ante todo que su concepto de “apertura” de la obra difiere de la concepción habitual del término, que resume de la siguiente manera:

“En tal sentido, pues, una obra de arte, forma completa y cerrada en su perfección de organismo perfectamente calibrado, es asimismo abierta, posibilidad de ser interpretada de mil modos diversos sin que su irreproducible singularidad resulte por ello alterada.” [1]

También en Milán (y en Nueva York) el artista Carlo Zanni ha desarrollado una obra que progresivamente le ha llevado a la creación de narraciones interactivas, obras abiertas en el sentido ofrecido por Eco, puesto que dentro de una forma completa y cerrada se abren al flujo de datos en la Red, a la intervención involuntaria del espectador, a la inteligencia artificial, al azar y a la serendipia. Piezas que, como las partituras de Stockhausen o Berio, deben interpretadas por el ejecutante, siendo en este caso el código de programación el que se somete a una lectura que, dentro de unos parámetros establecidos, es siempre nueva. La obra de arte se hace abierta al ser computable, sometida a un proceso continuo que genera diferentes productos en función de las variables que el artista ha decidido integrar. Se convierte, así, no en autor de una pieza sino de un sistema con múltiples resultados, una gran diversidad de formas de plasmar una misma idea.

Pero una obra abierta no es una obra inacabada (ya nos lo dice Eco), sino una obra formada por unidades estructurales en un sistema no planificado, susceptible de ser transformado por estímulos externos. Este sistema no es fortuito, sino que forma parte del concepto que ha desarrollado el artista, y que depende de una serie de decisiones conscientes que afectan tanto al contenido como al formato de la obra. En los últimos años, Carlo Zanni ha decidido crear este sistema para sus obras en base a un concepto que ha denominado Data Cinema (cine de datos) y que consiste en la exploración de las posibilidades de crear una narración audiovisual interactiva, ligada al lenguaje cinematográfico. Esto quiere decir que las obras de Zanni adoptan la forma de cortometrajes, en los que cada detalle es cuidadosamente estudiado (desde el atrezzo, los actores y el montaje a los títulos de crédito) y se desarrolla una narración fragmentada cuya interpretación depende del espectador (pero no es esta la única interacción). Como films, las piezas resultan sin duda interesantes, pero como he indicado antes no son simplemente composiciones audiovisuales sino obras interactivas. Esta última afirmación puede resultar confusa, puesto que las piezas no interactúan con el espectador en el sentido en el que nos tienen habituados el ratón del ordenador o los dispositivos táctiles. Las obras interactúan, han interactuado o lo harán en el futuro de una forma ajena al control del espectador, como un evento que al producirse genera una nueva instancia de la obra, un resultado más del sistema. Las piezas de Carlo Zanni que ahora se exponen en la galería SKL son, por tanto, instantes de unas obras abiertas que por su propia naturaleza no pueden captarse en su totalidad.

The Possible Ties Between Illness and Success (2006) [2] es un film de dos minutos de duración, realizado en los estudios de Cinecittà con los actores Stefania Orsola Garello e Ignazio Oliva. En él vemos a un hombre que yace en la cama, afectado de una enfermedad que cubre su piel con manchas negras. La meláncólica música de Gabriel Yared dota a la escena de dramatismo, mientras las palabras del escritor John Haskell flotan en el aire, anunciando un fin inevitable. Esta película, que pudo verse exclusivamente en Internet entre 2006 y 2007, se reeditaba cada día en función de los datos de los usuarios que accedían al sitio web para verla. El número de usuarios y sus países de procedencia determinaban la posición y el número de manchas que se añadían digitalmente al cuerpo del actor, de manera que cuanta más gente visionaba el film, más enfermo estaba el personaje. Con esta obra, Zanni planteaba “las posibles conexiones entre la enfermedad y el éxito”, de qué manera el deseo de éxito afecta a la psique del artista y también cómo observar en en sí un acto invasivo.

My Temporary Visiting Position From the Sunset Terrace Bar (2007-2010) [3] se abre con las palabras de la poetisa Ghada Samman, que dan paso un breve fragmento de un vídeo de aficionado, banal y torpe, en la terraza de un bar. La tarde se posa sobre el paisaje urbano mientras suena una canción del grupo Gotan Project. La escena termina de forma abrupta con el paso de una bandada de golondrinas. Todos estos son elementos que simbolizan de diversas formas la migración y el exilio, algo que se hace patente también en el propio paisaje: mientras la parte inferior pertenece a la ciudad de Ahlen, en Alemania, el cielo se ha extraído en tiempo real de una webcam situada en Nápoles, Italia. Por medio de un programa, se ha conservado una versión diaria de este film, variable en función del tiempo de la ciudad italiana.

Iterating My Way Into Oblivion (2010-2011) [4] nos muestra al artista en su domicilio, súbitamente interpelado por una voz en off, que recita mecánicamente los términos de uso de YouTube, el portal en el que se aloja esta pieza. El interminable soliloquio lleva al protagonista del aburrimiento a la desesperación, en un documento que se presenta como una “historia real” y que contiene numerosas referencias a la novela Rebelión en la granja de George Orwell, así como a la censura y la dominación que mantienen las grandes corporaciones sobre los usuarios en el espacio supuestamente libre que es Internet. El film se actualiza automáticamente cada vez que YouTube modifica sus términos de uso, con lo cual la historia puede verse modificada en el futuro, durante toda la eternidad, o al menos mientras existan YouTube e Internet.

My Country Is a Living Room (2011) [5] es un trabajo que se separa del concepto de Data Cinema pero continúa con total coherencia la exploración de las posibilidades de la obra abierta. En esta ocasión, Carlo Zanni ha creado un poema dedicado a la celebración del 150 aniversario de la unificación de Italia. Siguiendo el principio de interacción con los flujos de datos en la Red, el artista ha optado por escribir el poema empleando Google Scribe, un recurso de la empresa estadounidense que “asesora” en la redacción de textos completando palabras y sugiriendo la continuación de una frase a partir del análisis de la frecuencia con la que dos o más palabras aparecen en los textos publicados en Internet. De esta manera, Zanni se limitó a escribir las primeras palabras de cada verso en inglés, dejando que el programa sugiriese el resto, en una especie de cadáver exquisito informatizado. El poema se creó de esta manera a sí mismo, y ha sido traducido a 57 idiomas con el traductor automático Google Translate. Lejos de ser una simple sucesión de palabras sin sentido, el poema ha resultado ser sorprendentemente incisivo, como demuestran los siguientes versos:

Mr.LivingRoom había robado el dinero del gobierno y el sector privado y el sector público.

[…]

Mr.LivingRoom engaña al mundo entero está observando y esperando para los próximos años.

[…]

Mi país se muere en el final del día y la noche para asegurarse de que el nuevo sistema es una manera de obtener lo mejor de lo mejor en el mundo de la sala de estar.

Estoy seguro de que el nuevo sistema es una manera de obtener lo mejor de lo mejor en el mundo de la sala de estar.

No estoy solo en este mundo y el mundo de la sala de estar.

Mr.LivingRoom es una gran manera de obtener lo mejor de lo mejor en el mundo de la sala de estar.

Carlo Zanni deja que el mundo hable en su poema y modifique sus cortometrajes, a través de un flujo de datos al que sabe dotar de forma y contenido. Explora nuevas formas de trascender las definiciones del medio, de la misma manera en que busca nuevos caminos para la distribución de sus obras. Partiendo de su extensa experiencia en el net art y una larga investigación acerca del mercado del arte, el artista lanza ahora su último proyecto, People from Mars, una plataforma que facilita nuevos modelos de distribución y adquisición de piezas de arte digital, ediciones que se acercan al público general y cuestionan la concepción de la obra de arte como un objeto de lujo para una élite. Zanni opta así por crear formatos que hacen más accesible su trabajo y permiten que pueda ser adquirido, sin perder su calidad ni fuerza conceptual, a un público más amplio. La obra de arte es de esta manera, y en todos los sentidos, una obra abierta.

 

Pau Waelder

Agosto, 2011

 

————————-

[1] Umberto Eco, Obra abierta. Barcelona: Editorial Ariel, 1984, 74.

[2] The Possible Ties Between Illness and Success (2006).

[3] My Temporary Visiting Position at the Sunset Terrace Bar (2007-2010).

[4] Iterating My Way Into Oblivion (2010-2011).

[5] My Country Is a Living Room (2011).

 

Texto escrito para la exposición “People from Mars” de Carlo Zanni, en la galería SKL de Palma (Mallorca, España). Septiembre de 2011.