Magazines, Writing

22/07/2014

Unpainted, a new node for the digital art market


[Article published in art.es #58-59, 2014]
Translated from Spanish by Terry Berne

The first edition of UNPAINTED [1], a fair focused exclusively on digital art and new media, was held in Munich (Germany) from January 17th – 20th. With more than 50 participants (25 galleries, 9 institutions and 24 individual and collective projects), this new market initiative was launched with a reduced format but with an international profile. According to Annette Doms, the fair’s director, digital art is still unknown to the majority of the public (as well as collectors) but is gradually generating interest within the art market. “This is a specialized art fair, like Paris Photo, Drawing Now or Loop. To open a normal contemporary art fair doesn’t make sense, because we have so many great art fairs all over.” UNPAINTED defines itself as dedicated to “media art,” a term embracing digital art and other disciplines associated with new technologies. The name itself indicates its difference from other fairs: no painting will be found here. UNPAINTED was divided into three sections: galleries (featuring two groups: “youngish” and veteran); institutions and Lab 3.0, a selection of individual projects by artists without a gallery, curated by Li Zhenhua. In addition, “museum” featured a number of media artworks from the 60s to the present, curated by Wolf Lieser.

The circular Postpalast venue was intelligently organized into three concentric circles that established a hierarchy among the assorted spaces of varying dimensions that each gallery arranged in distinct manners: white cubes and black boxes, assortments of works and solo shows. The diverse formats employed in presenting the pieces were greater than usual for digital art: there were flat screens and projections, but also sculptures, installations, objects derived from calculation procedures, interactive work and two large tapestries. Even if, as Doms admitted, the selection process was not easy given the small number of galleries specializing in digital art, there was a notable presence of veteran galleries and of spaces that, despite having opened their doors scarcely two years ago (or even nine months), boasted interesting programs.

Two galleries that stand out for their trajectory over the last decade and their solid commitment to digital art are DAM (Berlin/Frankfurt) [2] and bitforms (New York). [3] DAM’s director Wolf Lieser (see interview in art.es #39) opted to present various works by Casey Reas and Aram Bartholl. The refined abstraction of Reas’ generative compositions, that unfold in projections, on flat screens and in a sculptural piece that shows both the generated work and the hardware that makes it possible, elegantly contrasts with Bartholl’s eclecticism, which reveals his interest in multiple aspects of digital culture. For his part, bitform’s Steven Sacks (see interview in art.es #38) devoted his space to the work of Quayola, who made his presence felt with three monumental pieces from the series Captives, inspired by Michelangelo’s sculptures and produced via an industrial process at the MU art space in Eindhoven. [4] If both bitforms and DAM maintain their focus on digital art, other galleries enlist digital artists into a program featuring more traditional formats as well; this is the case with Steve Turner Contemporary (Los Angeles) [5], who has opted to support young artists like Rafaël Rozendaal and Petra Cortright, whose work has passed rapidly from web sites to the gallery wall. Valérie Hasson-Benillouche, director of the Galerie Charlot (Paris) [6], seeks to produce an encounter between digital media and painting, alternating her program between abstract painters and artists like Antoine Schmitt, Jacques Perconte and the veterans Christa Sommerer and Laurent Mignonneau. Also based in Paris, XPO [7] has made a name for itself in just two years for their astute choice of artists. Director Philippe Riss, (see interview in art.es#57) chose the work of Evan Roth, Addie Wagenknecht and Vincent Broquaire. The restrained elegance of Broquaire’s drawings and animations sets up a dialogue with the ironic objects created by Roth and Wagenknecht in a combined vision of contemporary society marked by a mordant sense of humor. Also worth mentioning is the presence of the recently launched Transfer Gallery (New York) [8]. Opened in March of 2013 with the aim of creating a connection between web art and the gallery’s physical space, it focuses on a generation of artists who want to move from the Internet to the white (or black) cube.

UNPAINTED has begun its trajectory with a well-articulated approach, despite the deficiencies and lack of confidence characteristic of any emerging event. In future editions it will undoubtedly manage to expand its resources and refine its selection, but it has established a model to follow. In the opinion of gallerists, participation is positive because digital art needs to become better known. For Philippe Riss, “Given that artists have no market presence, we need to participate in specialized fairs.” Jereme Mongeon, co-director of Transfer, sees an opportunity to position the gallery at an international level, while the veteran Wolf Lieser affirms: “I have no doubt that the concept of a niche fair like this focusing on new media or digital art, and addressing a field which is totally new to the market, is necessary. Meanwhile, there are a lot of museums and collectors who are acquiring this kind of work and the public is ready to be informed, but right now, what you get here you can’t get anywhere else.”

Notes:

[1] UNPAINTED Media Art Fair. <http://www.unpainted.net>

[2] DAM Gallery. <http://www.dam-gallery.de>

[3] bitforms gallery. <http://www.bitforms.com>

[4] MU art space. <http://www.mu.nl>

[5] Steve Turner Contemporary. <http://steveturnercontemporary.com>

[6] Galerie Charlot. <http://www.galeriecharlot.com>

[7] XPO Gallery. <http://www.xpogallery.com>

[8] TRANSFER Gallery. <http://transfergallery.com>
[Artículo publicado en art.es #58-59, 2014]

Entre el 17 y el 20 de enero ha tenido lugar en el Postpalast de Munich la primera edición de UNPAINTED [1], una feria de arte centrada exclusivamente en el arte digital y de nuevos medios. Con algo más de 50 participantes (25 galerías de arte, 9 instituciones y 24 proyectos individuales de artistas y colectivos), esta nueva cita del mercado del arte arranca con un formato reducido pero con proyección internacional. En opinión de Annette Doms, directora de la feria, el arte digital es aún desconocido para una gran parte del público (así como para los coleccionistas), pero se está generando un creciente interés en el mercado del arte. “Esta es una feria especializada”, afirma, “como Paris Photo, Drawing Now o Loop. No tiene sentido empezar una feria de arte contemporáneo al uso, porque ya existen muchas grandes ferias de arte en todo el mundo.” Bajo esta premisa, UNPAINTED se identifica como una feria de “media art”, un término que engloba el arte digital y otras formas de creación vinculadas a las nuevas tecnologías. El vídeo arte también tiene cabida en la feria, pero “no el vídeo arte narrativo”, según puntualiza Doms, “sino el vídeo arte basado en software innovador y nuevas tecnologías.” El propio nombre de la feria indica la importancia que se otorga a los medios empleados en la creación de la obra de arte y su diferenciación respecto a las ferias de arte contemporáneo: aquí no hay pintura. Doms explica que el nombre surgió de una conversación con una persona que nunca había oído hablar del arte digital, y por lo tanto lo entendía como algo queno es pintura. La elección de esta sencilla definición del arte digital por parte de un no iniciado señala también que la feria se plantea como un evento dirigido al público general y no al colectivo especializado que suele acudir a festivales y simposios de arte y nuevos medios. Dirigirse al gran público implica dedicar una mayor atención al papel educativo de la feria, algo que no suele ser una prioridad en un evento propio del mercado del arte. “Para mí siempre ha sido importante educar al público”, señala Annette Doms, “no sólo mostrar qué es el arte digital.” Una manera en que la feria persigue este fin es a través de una sección denominada “museo”, que en esta primera edición muestra una selección de obras de media art desde los años 60 hasta la actualidad, comisariada por el galerista y experto en arte Wolf Lieser. La feria se mueve así entre su función habitual como punto de encuentro del mercado del arte y la necesidad de conectar con un público al que debe educar para lograr una apreciación de las obras.

Panóptico del arte digital

UNPAINTED se estructura en tres secciones principales: las galerías (divididas en dos grupos: jóvenes y veteranas), las instituciones y la sección Lab 3.0, una selección de proyectos individuales de artistas sin galería, comisariada por Li Zhenhua. A estas secciones se suman una serie de proyectos de artistas destacados y la ya mencionada sección “museo”. El recinto circular del Postpalast ha sido aprovechado de manera inteligente con una división basada en tres círculos concéntricos que determinan la jerarquía de los diferentes espacios: en el centro, un escenario octogonal acoge las conferencias y performances; alrededor del mismo, se disponen las galerías jóvenes, con stands de pequeño formato; un segundo anillo lo forman las galerías más veteranas, con espacios más grandes (aproximadamente el doble que las galerías emergentes) y finalmente, en el perímetro del recinto, una serie de diminutos almacenes del edificio han sido ocupados (como si se tratara de capillas) por los proyectos de la sección Lab 3.0. En un edificio adyacente se sitúan los espacios institucionales. Esta disposición crea espacios desiguales, que cada galería o artista resuelve de forma diferente: hay cubos blancos y cajas negras, acumulaciones de obras y solo shows. La variedad de los formatos en que se presentan las obras es mucho mayor de lo que se suele esperar al pensar en arte digital: ciertamente, hay pantallas planas y proyecciones, pero también esculturas, instalaciones, objetos derivados de un proceso de cálculo, piezas interactivas y dos grandes tapices.

Si bien, como admite Anette Doms, no fue sencillo realizar la selección debido al escaso número de galerías de arte dedicadas exclusivamente al arte digital, hay en esta feria una notable presencia de galerías veteranas y también de espacios que, pese a haber abierto sus puertas hace dos años (o apenas nueve meses), cuentan con un programa interesante. Dos de las galerías que se destacan por su trayectoria a lo largo de la última década y su sólida apuesta por el arte digital son DAM (Berlin/Frankfurt) [2] y bitforms (Nueva York) [3]. En la primera, el director Wolf Lieser (ver entrevista en art.es #39) ha optado por presentar diversas obras de los artistas Casey Reas y Aram Bartholl. La depurada abstracción de las composiciones generativas de Reas, que fluyen en una proyección, en pantallas planas o en una pieza escultórica que muestra tanto la obra generada como el hardware que la hace posible, contrasta elegantemente con el eclecticismo de Bartholl, interesado en las múltiples facetas de la cultura digital. Por su parte, Steven Sacks (ver entrevista en art.es #38) dedica el espacio de bitforms al trabajo de Quayola, que impone su presencia con las tres monumentales piezas de la serie Captives, una obra inspirada en la escultura de Miguel Ángel y realizada por medio de un proceso industrial en MU art space (Eindhoven) [4]. Si bien DAM y bitforms mantienen su programa centrado en el arte digital, otras galerías incorporan a artistas que trabajan con medios digitales en un programa que también expone otros formatos más “tradicionales”. Es el caso de Steve Turner Contemporary (Los Angeles) [5], que ha apostado por jóvenes nombres como Rafaël Rozendaal o Petra Cortright, cuyo trabajo ha pasado rápidamente de los sitios web a las paredes de la galería. En la Galerie Charlot (París) [6], la directora Valérie Hasson-Benillouche busca el encuentro entre los medios digitales y la pintura, alternando en su programa la obra de pintores abstractos y artistas como Antoine Schmitt, Jacques Perconte o los veteranos Christa Sommerer y Laurent Mignonneau. Radicada también en París, la galería XPO [7] se ha destacado en apenas dos años por su acertada selección de artistas. Para esta feria, su director Philippe Riss (ver entrevista en art.es #57) ha escogido la obra de Evan Roth, Addie Wagenknecht y Vincent Broquaire. La sobria elegancia de los dibujos y animaciones de Broquaire dialoga con los irónicos objetos creados por Roth y Wagenknecht en una visión conjunta de la sociedad actual marcada por un ácido sentido del humor. Finalmente, cabe destacar la presencia de la jovencísima galería TRANSFER (Nueva York) [8], fundada en marzo de 2013 y dedicada a establecer una conexión entre la creación en Internet y el espacio físico de la galería para una generación de artistas que busca pasar de la web al cubo blanco (o negro).

Lo que no puede encontrarse en otro lugar

UNPAINTED ha iniciado su trayectoria con una propuesta bien articulada, pese a las inseguridades y deficiencias propias de una feria emergente, y de hecho podría haber tenido un comienzo más modesto. En las próximas ediciones sin duda logrará ampliar sus recursos y depurar su selección, pero ya en este primer año ha establecido un modelo a seguir. En opinión de los galeristas, participar en esta feria es positivo en la medida en que el arte digital necesita darse a conocer. Para Philippe Riss, “en tanto que los artistas no logran tener una presencia en el mercado, es preciso participar en ferias especializadas.” Jereme Mongeon, co-director de TRANSFER, ve en esta feria una oportunidad para posicionarse a nivel internacional, mientras que el veterano Wolf Lieser asevera: “no tengo ninguna duda de que el concepto de un feria dedicada al arte de nuevos medios, que se centra en un terreno que es totalmente nuevo en el mercado, es necesaria. Al mismo tiempo, hay muchos museos y coleccionistas que están adquiriendo estas obras y el público está preparado para informarse, pero ahora mismo lo que se encuentra aquí no puede encontrarse en ningún otro lugar.”

Notas:

[1] UNPAINTED Media Art Fair. <http://www.unpainted.net>

[2] DAM Gallery. <http://www.dam-gallery.de>

[3] bitforms gallery. <http://www.bitforms.com>

[4] MU art space. <http://www.mu.nl>

[5] Steve Turner Contemporary. <http://steveturnercontemporary.com>

[6] Galerie Charlot. <http://www.galeriecharlot.com>

[7] XPO Gallery. <http://www.xpogallery.com>

[8] TRANSFER Gallery. <http://transfergallery.com>
[Article publicat en castellà i anglès a art.es #58-59, 2014]

Entre el 17 y el 20 de enero ha tenido lugar en el Postpalast de Munich la primera edición de UNPAINTED [1], una feria de arte centrada exclusivamente en el arte digital y de nuevos medios. Con algo más de 50 participantes (25 galerías de arte, 9 instituciones y 24 proyectos individuales de artistas y colectivos), esta nueva cita del mercado del arte arranca con un formato reducido pero con proyección internacional. En opinión de Annette Doms, directora de la feria, el arte digital es aún desconocido para una gran parte del público (así como para los coleccionistas), pero se está generando un creciente interés en el mercado del arte. “Esta es una feria especializada”, afirma, “como Paris Photo, Drawing Now o Loop. No tiene sentido empezar una feria de arte contemporáneo al uso, porque ya existen muchas grandes ferias de arte en todo el mundo.” Bajo esta premisa, UNPAINTED se identifica como una feria de “media art”, un término que engloba el arte digital y otras formas de creación vinculadas a las nuevas tecnologías. El vídeo arte también tiene cabida en la feria, pero “no el vídeo arte narrativo”, según puntualiza Doms, “sino el vídeo arte basado en software innovador y nuevas tecnologías.” El propio nombre de la feria indica la importancia que se otorga a los medios empleados en la creación de la obra de arte y su diferenciación respecto a las ferias de arte contemporáneo: aquí no hay pintura. Doms explica que el nombre surgió de una conversación con una persona que nunca había oído hablar del arte digital, y por lo tanto lo entendía como algo queno es pintura. La elección de esta sencilla definición del arte digital por parte de un no iniciado señala también que la feria se plantea como un evento dirigido al público general y no al colectivo especializado que suele acudir a festivales y simposios de arte y nuevos medios. Dirigirse al gran público implica dedicar una mayor atención al papel educativo de la feria, algo que no suele ser una prioridad en un evento propio del mercado del arte. “Para mí siempre ha sido importante educar al público”, señala Annette Doms, “no sólo mostrar qué es el arte digital.” Una manera en que la feria persigue este fin es a través de una sección denominada “museo”, que en esta primera edición muestra una selección de obras de media art desde los años 60 hasta la actualidad, comisariada por el galerista y experto en arte Wolf Lieser. La feria se mueve así entre su función habitual como punto de encuentro del mercado del arte y la necesidad de conectar con un público al que debe educar para lograr una apreciación de las obras.

Panóptico del arte digital

UNPAINTED se estructura en tres secciones principales: las galerías (divididas en dos grupos: jóvenes y veteranas), las instituciones y la sección Lab 3.0, una selección de proyectos individuales de artistas sin galería, comisariada por Li Zhenhua. A estas secciones se suman una serie de proyectos de artistas destacados y la ya mencionada sección “museo”. El recinto circular del Postpalast ha sido aprovechado de manera inteligente con una división basada en tres círculos concéntricos que determinan la jerarquía de los diferentes espacios: en el centro, un escenario octogonal acoge las conferencias y performances; alrededor del mismo, se disponen las galerías jóvenes, con stands de pequeño formato; un segundo anillo lo forman las galerías más veteranas, con espacios más grandes (aproximadamente el doble que las galerías emergentes) y finalmente, en el perímetro del recinto, una serie de diminutos almacenes del edificio han sido ocupados (como si se tratara de capillas) por los proyectos de la sección Lab 3.0. En un edificio adyacente se sitúan los espacios institucionales. Esta disposición crea espacios desiguales, que cada galería o artista resuelve de forma diferente: hay cubos blancos y cajas negras, acumulaciones de obras y solo shows. La variedad de los formatos en que se presentan las obras es mucho mayor de lo que se suele esperar al pensar en arte digital: ciertamente, hay pantallas planas y proyecciones, pero también esculturas, instalaciones, objetos derivados de un proceso de cálculo, piezas interactivas y dos grandes tapices.

Si bien, como admite Anette Doms, no fue sencillo realizar la selección debido al escaso número de galerías de arte dedicadas exclusivamente al arte digital, hay en esta feria una notable presencia de galerías veteranas y también de espacios que, pese a haber abierto sus puertas hace dos años (o apenas nueve meses), cuentan con un programa interesante. Dos de las galerías que se destacan por su trayectoria a lo largo de la última década y su sólida apuesta por el arte digital son DAM (Berlin/Frankfurt) [2] y bitforms (Nueva York) [3]. En la primera, el director Wolf Lieser (ver entrevista en art.es #39) ha optado por presentar diversas obras de los artistas Casey Reas y Aram Bartholl. La depurada abstracción de las composiciones generativas de Reas, que fluyen en una proyección, en pantallas planas o en una pieza escultórica que muestra tanto la obra generada como el hardware que la hace posible, contrasta elegantemente con el eclecticismo de Bartholl, interesado en las múltiples facetas de la cultura digital. Por su parte, Steven Sacks (ver entrevista en art.es #38) dedica el espacio de bitforms al trabajo de Quayola, que impone su presencia con las tres monumentales piezas de la serie Captives, una obra inspirada en la escultura de Miguel Ángel y realizada por medio de un proceso industrial en MU art space (Eindhoven) [4]. Si bien DAM y bitforms mantienen su programa centrado en el arte digital, otras galerías incorporan a artistas que trabajan con medios digitales en un programa que también expone otros formatos más “tradicionales”. Es el caso de Steve Turner Contemporary (Los Angeles) [5], que ha apostado por jóvenes nombres como Rafaël Rozendaal o Petra Cortright, cuyo trabajo ha pasado rápidamente de los sitios web a las paredes de la galería. En la Galerie Charlot (París) [6], la directora Valérie Hasson-Benillouche busca el encuentro entre los medios digitales y la pintura, alternando en su programa la obra de pintores abstractos y artistas como Antoine Schmitt, Jacques Perconte o los veteranos Christa Sommerer y Laurent Mignonneau. Radicada también en París, la galería XPO [7] se ha destacado en apenas dos años por su acertada selección de artistas. Para esta feria, su director Philippe Riss (ver entrevista en art.es #57) ha escogido la obra de Evan Roth, Addie Wagenknecht y Vincent Broquaire. La sobria elegancia de los dibujos y animaciones de Broquaire dialoga con los irónicos objetos creados por Roth y Wagenknecht en una visión conjunta de la sociedad actual marcada por un ácido sentido del humor. Finalmente, cabe destacar la presencia de la jovencísima galería TRANSFER (Nueva York) [8], fundada en marzo de 2013 y dedicada a establecer una conexión entre la creación en Internet y el espacio físico de la galería para una generación de artistas que busca pasar de la web al cubo blanco (o negro).

Lo que no puede encontrarse en otro lugar

UNPAINTED ha iniciado su trayectoria con una propuesta bien articulada, pese a las inseguridades y deficiencias propias de una feria emergente, y de hecho podría haber tenido un comienzo más modesto. En las próximas ediciones sin duda logrará ampliar sus recursos y depurar su selección, pero ya en este primer año ha establecido un modelo a seguir. En opinión de los galeristas, participar en esta feria es positivo en la medida en que el arte digital necesita darse a conocer. Para Philippe Riss, “en tanto que los artistas no logran tener una presencia en el mercado, es preciso participar en ferias especializadas.” Jereme Mongeon, co-director de TRANSFER, ve en esta feria una oportunidad para posicionarse a nivel internacional, mientras que el veterano Wolf Lieser asevera: “no tengo ninguna duda de que el concepto de un feria dedicada al arte de nuevos medios, que se centra en un terreno que es totalmente nuevo en el mercado, es necesaria. Al mismo tiempo, hay muchos museos y coleccionistas que están adquiriendo estas obras y el público está preparado para informarse, pero ahora mismo lo que se encuentra aquí no puede encontrarse en ningún otro lugar.”

Notas:

[1] UNPAINTED Media Art Fair. <http://www.unpainted.net>

[2] DAM Gallery. <http://www.dam-gallery.de>

[3] bitforms gallery. <http://www.bitforms.com>

[4] MU art space. <http://www.mu.nl>

[5] Steve Turner Contemporary. <http://steveturnercontemporary.com>

[6] Galerie Charlot. <http://www.galeriecharlot.com>

[7] XPO Gallery. <http://www.xpogallery.com>

[8] TRANSFER Gallery. <http://transfergallery.com>