Interviews, Writing

23/01/2014

XPO, the art gallery in the digital age

 

In April of 2012, in the Paris neighborhood of the Haut Marais, Philippe Riss opened the XPO Gallery which is becoming known thanks to an agenda featuring the work of well-known international digital artists (Aram Bartholl, Grégory Chatonsky, Constant Dullaart, Evan Roth…). From a perspective that explores art associated with the prevailing digital era, XPO shows drawings as well as net art and participates in numerous contemporary art fairs. Philippe Riss is currently a member of the selection committee for UNPAINTED, the first digital art fair which will take place in Munich (Germany) from January 17-20, 2014.

Pau Waelder: Do you define XPO as a digital art gallery?
Philippe Riss: No, we define it as a gallery in the digital era. Digital art doesn’t exist; rather art in the digital era does. We’re committed to going beyond established limits by mixing both media and problematical issues, demonstrating that the virtual has a place in the expositive space. Our perspective on art in the digital era depends not on the technology but on the relationship of society with the digital
world. It’s this incorporation of the human element that allows the gallery to pursue an objective that’s relevant to our time. In April we’re celebrating our second year with a show by Constant Dullaart.

PW: The gallery is located in the Gaîté Lyrique quarter. Do you think this new and prominent cultural center will attract a public more interested in art that employs new technologies? Will collectors of this kind of art emerge from among the younger generations?
PR: The Haut Marais is a neighborhood in the midst of change. It possesses great diversity, it hasn’t yet become completely gentrified and it’s very central. We’ve found a magical space with a wonderful store front. I wasn’t sure at first (I wanted to find a place in Belleville), but the proximity of La Gaîte Lyrique, The Pompidou Center and the presence of good galleries (New Galerie, Michèle Didier…) convinced me. Young collectors live in the area, but also, being very central, it’s easy for international collectors to get to. And it’s true that young collectors are attracted to these new approaches: a generation is emerging that is creating very specific collections: purchasing a Broquaire, Roth or Bartholl is to begin building one of the most beautiful collections of the 21st century, and at still accessible prices.

PW: Most of the works in the gallery are in more or less habitual formats (digital printing, objects, sculpture) despite the fact that some artists are trying to escape the limitations of galleries or the artwork as object (Constant Dulaart, Aram Bartholl…) How do you work with regard to a piece’s format?
PR: We’re not especially worried about formats, we mix them, and although we curate the shows, the artist decides what medium is used. The medium in itself isn’t the important thing, but whether or not the piece is beautiful and relevant. In that case, it will undoubtedly find a collector. It’s true that in the art market’s current state of maturity it’s easier to sell a work in a traditional or conventional format, but post-industrial formats are starting to prevail more and more.

PW: Offline Art: new2 was a very innovative show for its manner of presenting net art works [1]. Do you see this as an effective model for showing this kind of work, or was it simply a way of challenging the conventions of art galleries?
PR: That show, the idea for which I’ll always be grateful to Aram Bartholl, was both prophetic and historical, and opened up areas for exploring the apparent immateriality of net art: both its significance for the market and the development of an in situ experience of the work. As we showed, the gallery can sustain itself as a real space, a venue favoring an itinerary, or by becoming a simple access point. If net art is accessible everywhere at all times, at XPO we’ve managed to mark its presence in a particular place.

PW: Have you considered selling artworks directly through your web site? What’s your opinion about the sale of pieces that don’t depend on an object or that are sold in series in digital devices, like s[edition] does?
PR: We’re thinking about that possibility, but for the moment the existing models aren’t satisfactory. These initiatives are limited to applying 20th century economic models to the Internet domain. To offer an edition of a digital work, which by definition is infinitely reproducible, doesn’t satisfy me on a conceptual level. It’s not what I expect of these kinds of pieces and I think we need to invent new models.

PW: Do differences between digital and contemporary art still exist?
PR: We strongly believe that collecting contemporary art is to collect digital art, though it’s not yet widespread. The model developed more than 30 years ago with regard to conceptual art is attempting to sustain itself and survive, but we’re in the midst of a transformation of enormous proportions.

PW: As a member of the selection committee for the digital art fair UNPAINTED, do you think it’s better to participate in a specialized fair than in a general one?
PR: I’m participating in UNPAINTED with the same spirit that I do in Drawing Now (a Parisian fair specializing in drawing) or Moving Image (London, New York). They’re leading events that are very specialized, just as this new fair is, for which we owe thanks to Annette Doms and which will give confidence to new collectors as it will also educate veterans. But this doesn’t deter us from participating in more generalist fairs: in November we presented the work of Grégory Chatonsky at Art Taipei and that of Aram Bartholl at YIA Paris. The market is experiencing a complete transformation and we should participate in all these changes.

English translation by Terry Berne

 

[1] Offline Art: new2, curated by Aram Bartholl, exhibited net art works via routers that created local networks for each piece. The public viewed the works by connecting to the networks through their mobile devices.

En abril de 2012, Philippe Riss abre en el barrio parisino del Haut Marais la galería XPO, un espacio de arte contemporáneo que, pese a su corta trayectoria, se está dando a conocer gracias a un programa que integra sin fisuras la obra de destacados artistas del panorama internacional del arte digital, tales como Aram Bartholl, Grégory Chatonsky, Constant Dullaart o Evan Roth, entre otros. Desde su perspectiva como galería que explora el arte vinculado a nuestra era digital, XPO expone tanto dibujos como obras de net art y participa en numerosas ferias de arte contemporáneo. Actualmente, Philippe Riss forma parte del comité de selección de UNPAINTED, la primera feria de arte digital que tendrá lugar en Munich, del 17 al 20 de enero de 2014.

Pau Waelder: XPO es una galería joven pero ya se ha dado a conocer con sus exposiciones, en las que se suelen presentar obras de arte digital. ¿Se define XPO como una galería de arte digital?
Philippe Riss: Ciertamente, ¡en abril de 2014 celebraremos nuestro segundo año con una exposición de Constant Dullaart! No nos definimos como una galería de arte digital sino como una galería en la era digital. En nuestra opinión, no existe el arte digital, sino el arte en la era digital. De hecho, la galería se dedica a ir constantemente más allá de los límites establecidos al mezclar los medios y las problemáticas, demostrando (si ello es aún necesario) que lo virtual tiene su lugar en un espacio expositivo. Nuestra perspectiva del arte en la era digital no depende de la tecnología sino que se centra en la relación que nuestra sociedad mantiene con el mundo digital. Es precisamente esta inserción de un componente humano la que permite a la galería perseguir un objetivo que es pertinente para nuestra época.

PW: La galería se sitúa en el barrio de La Gaîté Lyrique. ¿Cree que la presencia de este nuevo y destacado centro de cultura digital puede atraer a un público más interesado por el arte vinculado a las nuevas tecnologías? ¿Cabe esperar que entre las generaciones más jóvenes surgirán los coleccionistas de este tipo de arte?
PR: Nos hemos instalado en este barrio del Haut Marais porque es un barrio en plena mutación. Tiene mucha diversidad, aún no ha sido plenamente aburguesado y es muy céntrico. Además, aquí hemos encontrado un espacio mágico con un escaparate magnífico. Dudé un poco (quería instalarme en Belleville) pero la proximidad de La Gaîté Lyrique, el Centre Pompidou y la presencia de buenas galerías como New Galerie o Michèle Didier, entre otras muchas, me convencieron. En efecto, en esta zona viven jóvenes coleccionistas, pero también al ser una zona céntrica es fácil para un coleccionista internacional venir a visitarnos. Y, en respuesta a su pregunta, debo decir que es cierto que los jóvenes coleccionistas se interesan por estas nuevas propuestas. De hecho, es impactante ver cómo está naciendo una generación de jóvenes coleccionistas que crean colecciones muy precisas: comprar un Broquaire, Roth o Bartholl es empezar a construir una de las más bellas colecciones del siglo XXI, a precios aún accesibles.

PW: La mayoría de las obras que se venden en la galería se presentan en formatos más o menos habituales (impresión digital, objeto, escultura), a pesar de que algunos artistas buscan escapar a las limitaciones de la galería o la obra de arte como objeto (por ejemplo, Constant Dulaart o Aram Bartholl). ¿Cómo trabajan en relación a los formatos de las obras?
PR: No nos preocupan especialmente los formatos, los mezclamos, y si bien comisariamos las exposiciones, es el artista quien decide en total libertad el medio que emplea en su obra. Pensamos que el medio en sí no es lo que cuenta, sino que la obra sea bella y pertinente. En este caso, sin duda encontrará un coleccionista. Es cierto, no obstante, que en este estado de madurez del mercado es más fácil vender una obra en formato tradicional o habitual (por emplear los términos que usted propone), pero considero que los formatos post-industriales se están imponiendo cada vez más.

PW: “Offline Art: new2”[1] ha sido una exposición muy innovadora por su modelo de presentación de obras de net art. ¿Considera este modelo una forma efectiva de mostrar estas obras o simplemente como un gesto de desafío a las convenciones de la galería de arte?
PR: Esta exposición, que surge de una propuesta que siempre le agradeceré a Aram Bartholl, era prospectiva e histórica y ha abierto varios campos de exploración alrededor de la supuesta inmaterialidad del net art: tanto su significado para el mercado del arte como el desarrollo de una experiencia in situ de la obra. “Offline Art: new2”, tal como se mostró en la galería, puede mantenerse como un espacio real, un recinto que permite un recorrido, o convertirse en un simple “punto de acceso”. Si el net art se caracteriza por ser accesible en todo lugar y en cualquier momento, considero que en XPO hemos conseguido marcar su presencia en un lugar determinado.

PW: ¿Ha considerado vender obras de arte directamente a través del sitio web de la galería? ¿Qué opina de las opciones de venta de obras que no dependan de un objeto o sean vendidas en serie en dispositivos digitales, como hace s[edition]?
PR: Estamos considerando esta posibilidad, pero de momento no nos satisfacen los modelos existentes. Personalmente, opino que estas propuestas se limitan a aplicar modelos económicos del siglo XX en el ámbito de Internet. Así, por ejemplo, la idea de proponer una edición para una obra digital, que por definición es duplicable hasta el infinito, no me satisface a nivel conceptual. No es lo que yo espero que este tipo de obras y creo que es preciso inventar modelos nuevos.

PW: Según su experiencia, ¿existe aún una separación entre el arte digital y el arte contemporáneo?
PR: Creemos firmemente que coleccionar arte contemporáneo es coleccionar arte digital. Entiendo que mi visión no es aún la visión mayoritaria. El modelo que se ha construido desde hace más de treinta años en torno al arte conceptual trata de mantenerse y resistir, pero no se puede negar que estamos en medio de una transformación de grandes proporciones.

PW: Como miembro del comité de selección de la feria de arte digital UNPAINTED en Munich, ¿cree que es más beneficioso participar en una feria especializada que en una feria de arte contemporáneo?
PR: Pienso participar en UNPAINTED con el mismo espíritu que participo en Drawing Now (una feria parisina especializada en dibujo) o Moving Image en Londres y Nueva York. Son eventos punteros muy especializados y de la misma manera lo es esta nueva feria especializada, por la que hay que agradecer a Annette Doms. Es ciertamente excitante contar con un evento que va aportar confianza a los nuevos coleccionistas y educar a los más mayores. Pero, por supuesto, eso no nos impide participar en ferias generalistas: por ejemplo, en noviembre presentamos las obras de Grégory Chatonsky en Art Taipei y las de Aram Bartholl en YIA Paris, una feria de alto nivel que no obstante tiene una selección más bien tradicional. El mercado del arte está hoy en plena mutación, y debemos participar en esos cambios.

[1] Offline Art: new2 es una exposición comisariada por Aram Bartholl en la que se mostraron obras de net art por medio de routers que creaban redes locales para cada obra. El público visualizaba las obras conectándose a dichas redes a través de sus dispositivos móviles.

 

En abril de 2012, Philippe Riss abre en el barrio parisino del Haut Marais la galería XPO, un espacio de arte contemporáneo que, pese a su corta trayectoria, se está dando a conocer gracias a un programa que integra sin fisuras la obra de destacados artistas del panorama internacional del arte digital, tales como Aram Bartholl, Grégory Chatonsky, Constant Dullaart o Evan Roth, entre otros. Desde su perspectiva como galería que explora el arte vinculado a nuestra era digital, XPO expone tanto dibujos como obras de net art y participa en numerosas ferias de arte contemporáneo. Actualmente, Philippe Riss forma parte del comité de selección de UNPAINTED, la primera feria de arte digital que tendrá lugar en Munich, del 17 al 20 de enero de 2014.

Pau Waelder: XPO es una galería joven pero ya se ha dado a conocer con sus exposiciones, en las que se suelen presentar obras de arte digital. ¿Se define XPO como una galería de arte digital?
Philippe Riss: Ciertamente, ¡en abril de 2014 celebraremos nuestro segundo año con una exposición de Constant Dullaart! No nos definimos como una galería de arte digital sino como una galería en la era digital. En nuestra opinión, no existe el arte digital, sino el arte en la era digital. De hecho, la galería se dedica a ir constantemente más allá de los límites establecidos al mezclar los medios y las problemáticas, demostrando (si ello es aún necesario) que lo virtual tiene su lugar en un espacio expositivo. Nuestra perspectiva del arte en la era digital no depende de la tecnología sino que se centra en la relación que nuestra sociedad mantiene con el mundo digital. Es precisamente esta inserción de un componente humano la que permite a la galería perseguir un objetivo que es pertinente para nuestra época.

PW: La galería se sitúa en el barrio de La Gaîté Lyrique. ¿Cree que la presencia de este nuevo y destacado centro de cultura digital puede atraer a un público más interesado por el arte vinculado a las nuevas tecnologías? ¿Cabe esperar que entre las generaciones más jóvenes surgirán los coleccionistas de este tipo de arte?
PR: Nos hemos instalado en este barrio del Haut Marais porque es un barrio en plena mutación. Tiene mucha diversidad, aún no ha sido plenamente aburguesado y es muy céntrico. Además, aquí hemos encontrado un espacio mágico con un escaparate magnífico. Dudé un poco (quería instalarme en Belleville) pero la proximidad de La Gaîté Lyrique, el Centre Pompidou y la presencia de buenas galerías como New Galerie o Michèle Didier, entre otras muchas, me convencieron. En efecto, en esta zona viven jóvenes coleccionistas, pero también al ser una zona céntrica es fácil para un coleccionista internacional venir a visitarnos. Y, en respuesta a su pregunta, debo decir que es cierto que los jóvenes coleccionistas se interesan por estas nuevas propuestas. De hecho, es impactante ver cómo está naciendo una generación de jóvenes coleccionistas que crean colecciones muy precisas: comprar un Broquaire, Roth o Bartholl es empezar a construir una de las más bellas colecciones del siglo XXI, a precios aún accesibles.

PW: La mayoría de las obras que se venden en la galería se presentan en formatos más o menos habituales (impresión digital, objeto, escultura), a pesar de que algunos artistas buscan escapar a las limitaciones de la galería o la obra de arte como objeto (por ejemplo, Constant Dulaart o Aram Bartholl). ¿Cómo trabajan en relación a los formatos de las obras?
PR: No nos preocupan especialmente los formatos, los mezclamos, y si bien comisariamos las exposiciones, es el artista quien decide en total libertad el medio que emplea en su obra. Pensamos que el medio en sí no es lo que cuenta, sino que la obra sea bella y pertinente. En este caso, sin duda encontrará un coleccionista. Es cierto, no obstante, que en este estado de madurez del mercado es más fácil vender una obra en formato tradicional o habitual (por emplear los términos que usted propone), pero considero que los formatos post-industriales se están imponiendo cada vez más.

PW: “Offline Art: new2”[1] ha sido una exposición muy innovadora por su modelo de presentación de obras de net art. ¿Considera este modelo una forma efectiva de mostrar estas obras o simplemente como un gesto de desafío a las convenciones de la galería de arte?
PR: Esta exposición, que surge de una propuesta que siempre le agradeceré a Aram Bartholl, era prospectiva e histórica y ha abierto varios campos de exploración alrededor de la supuesta inmaterialidad del net art: tanto su significado para el mercado del arte como el desarrollo de una experiencia in situ de la obra. “Offline Art: new2”, tal como se mostró en la galería, puede mantenerse como un espacio real, un recinto que permite un recorrido, o convertirse en un simple “punto de acceso”. Si el net art se caracteriza por ser accesible en todo lugar y en cualquier momento, considero que en XPO hemos conseguido marcar su presencia en un lugar determinado.

PW: ¿Ha considerado vender obras de arte directamente a través del sitio web de la galería? ¿Qué opina de las opciones de venta de obras que no dependan de un objeto o sean vendidas en serie en dispositivos digitales, como hace s[edition]?
PR: Estamos considerando esta posibilidad, pero de momento no nos satisfacen los modelos existentes. Personalmente, opino que estas propuestas se limitan a aplicar modelos económicos del siglo XX en el ámbito de Internet. Así, por ejemplo, la idea de proponer una edición para una obra digital, que por definición es duplicable hasta el infinito, no me satisface a nivel conceptual. No es lo que yo espero que este tipo de obras y creo que es preciso inventar modelos nuevos.

PW: Según su experiencia, ¿existe aún una separación entre el arte digital y el arte contemporáneo?
PR: Creemos firmemente que coleccionar arte contemporáneo es coleccionar arte digital. Entiendo que mi visión no es aún la visión mayoritaria. El modelo que se ha construido desde hace más de treinta años en torno al arte conceptual trata de mantenerse y resistir, pero no se puede negar que estamos en medio de una transformación de grandes proporciones.

PW: Como miembro del comité de selección de la feria de arte digital UNPAINTED en Munich, ¿cree que es más beneficioso participar en una feria especializada que en una feria de arte contemporáneo?
PR: Pienso participar en UNPAINTED con el mismo espíritu que participo en Drawing Now (una feria parisina especializada en dibujo) o Moving Image en Londres y Nueva York. Son eventos punteros muy especializados y de la misma manera lo es esta nueva feria especializada, por la que hay que agradecer a Annette Doms. Es ciertamente excitante contar con un evento que va aportar confianza a los nuevos coleccionistas y educar a los más mayores. Pero, por supuesto, eso no nos impide participar en ferias generalistas: por ejemplo, en noviembre presentamos las obras de Grégory Chatonsky en Art Taipei y las de Aram Bartholl en YIA Paris, una feria de alto nivel que no obstante tiene una selección más bien tradicional. El mercado del arte está hoy en plena mutación, y debemos participar en esos cambios.

 

[1] Offline Art: new2 es una exposición comisariada por Aram Bartholl en la que se mostraron obras de net art por medio de routers que creaban redes locales para cada obra. El público visualizaba las obras conectándose a dichas redes a través de sus dispositivos móviles.