Books, Writing

18/10/2011

The Future of the Art of the Future

[Text for the catalogue of the Art Futura 2011 festival]

 

Art associated with the new technologies has frequently been referred to as “the art of the future”, a definition that is intended to be eulogistic and as such has dominated the discourse on this tendency within contemporary art, a discourse that has always been linked to the utopian promises of a technological industry in constant development. As a result, the word “future” has become a label commonly used by organizations, centers and events dedicated to the encounter of art, technology and society: festivals such as FutureEverything (previously Futuresonic) in Manchester or Futur-en-Seine in Paris and, of course, ArtFutura; the Ars Electronica Center in Linz, referred to as “the museum of the future”; the Futurelab, Ars Electronica’s laboratory of investigation and development, or the center of culture, technology and innovation Oi Futuro in Rio de Janeiro are some examples of this identification to which we should add the names of exhibitions and conferences that, in one way or another, promise to examine an aspect of the future through the contemporary creation. Without a doubt, the use of the word “future” does make sense in the light of the technological innovations that the creations presented in these events contribute and the reflections they give rise to concerning our relationships with the technologies which advance and forecast situations to be produced within a few years. In fact, the speed of technological development has created a phase-lag with respect to society that still has not created a cultural framework to enable it to assimilate these technological contributions. The current framework is provided by, in short, the works of art and new media along with the reflections of theorists, investigators and artists that all come together at these forums. Nevertheless, it is also true that the wager for the future implies directing our attention towards “the newest” or that which is in a phase of emerging and by paying less attention to everything that makes up part of the past.

 

Almost twenty years ago, the writer Stewart Brand criticized the acceleration that art linked to new technologies, often centered on innovation as their only objective, is subjected to: “If you’re among the first into wet light shows, electronic music, adventure computer games, virtual reality, or artificial life, you get a free ride on the novelty of the medium. There’s no tradition to overcome. Invention is already manifest in the medium. All you have to do is play, and it looks like invention.” [1] Brand warned that this sort of creation without a background was doomed to facilitate the appearance of new technological developments with which other artists would create their works while the names and contributions of the pioneers would be forgotten. Two decades later, if it is true that new media art continues to be subjected to the rules of constant innovation, it is also true that the use of the present technologies is becoming standardized and that the careers of some artists in this area have become consolidated (while others are still waiting for the recognition they deserve) and that experiments that endeavor to establish a history between art, science and technology are multiplying. The desire to forecast the future has calmed down at the rhythm that the past has been revealed as a source of inspiration and the medium itself has reached its first maturity. In the present context, the art of the future has to establish its roots in the past and link itself to historic and contemporary artistic trends in order to obtain recognition within the art world. In the prologue of his book Art and Electronic Media, the historian Edward Shanken states: “In our time, electronic technologies have become so pervasive that it is hard to imagine contemporary music produced without electric instruments or to imagine an author writing or an architect designing without the aid of the computer. Yet, with few exceptions, electronic art has remained under-recognized in mainstream art discourses.” [2] With these words, Shanken asserts that new media art is really an art of the present that uses the same technologies that have become indispensable in many other spheres of everyday life. Still, he points out, this art has been ignored by the art world for too long and as a result he proposes “to enable the rich genealogy of art and electronic media in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries to be understood and seen –literally and figuratively– as central to the histories of art and visual culture.” [3]

 

As a result, another problem of the art of the future comes to light, besides the possibility noted by Brand of developing without history, we have that of it being ignored by the art world. According to Shanken, the validation of new media art depends on it being linked to the main artistic trends in such a way that it is identified as another tendency within contemporary art. From the point of view of the art market, the gallery owner Wolf Lieser stresses that it is not so much a question of its history as it is this art’s link to the present moment that is important: “Paintings and photos still achieve premium prices in the art market, but are they really sources of inspiration for today and tomorrow? Compared to other forms of artistic expression, the computer is a rather new tool and a medium that has changed our culture and society like nothing else in the last few decades. Digital art is multifaceted and surprising. It corresponds to our time.” [4] According to Lieser, therefore, new media art may well have greater value than other artistic manifestations given its closer link with contemporary culture, an argument based on the idea that contemporary art establishes its validity on its link to the present. The main argument of contemporary art is centered in the most absolute present. In this sense, as indicated by the historian Boris Groys: “art seems to be truly contemporary if it is authentic, if for instance it captures and expresses the presence of the present in a way that is radically uncorrupted by past traditions or strategies aiming at success in the future.” [5] Taking the idea expressed by Groys as a starting point, new media art cannot, therefore, be an art of the future should it also wish to identify with contemporary art. For this reason, as indicated by Shanken and Lieser, we understand that in reality we are dealing with an art of the present, of the ongoing encounter between art and technology. Still, as we have noted, we still have not seen the full implications of this highly advanced technology, although we have projected its future development in our imagination.

 

Paradoxically, the continuity of the art of the future may depend on what we consider to be contemporary art. While integrating into the art world, new media art not only manages to be recognized and studied, but it is also gaining presence on the market and is, therefore, beginning to form part of private and public collections. The works are beginning to be less conceived as experiments to be shown at a festival for a few days and more like pieces that are more stable and reliable and which can be exhibited in a permanent way. The museums and foundations that acquire these pieces should also concern themselves with maintaining them and, if necessary, updating them when the technology that supports them becomes obsolete. The conservation of the works also requires exhaustive documentation which will make more information about the work of the artist available that will be of great use to the historians of the future. On the other hand, the study of the past of this art will allow us to outline its foundations and recognize the work of its pioneers whose contributions will not be lost in the “black hole of technology” as defined by Stewart Brand, when referring to the process of accelerated obsolescence which, in his opinion, would lead to a new media art without history or artists. It seems strange that the continuity of the so-called “art of the future” is under a greater threat than that which we consider to be “art of the present”, however, in fact, they are its most outstanding characteristics (experimentation with new technological resources, media and relationships between spectator and work; rupture with the traditional models of exhibition and distribution of works of art; creation of a process rather than a finished piece…) that have become its weaknesses when it comes to integrating this sort of artistic creation into the rigid structures of the art world. The challenge, therefore, consists of creating and maintaining an ecosystem for new media art, encouraging its study and understanding, documenting its genealogy and recognizing the contributions made by its pioneer artists whose works can only be appreciated once the context in which they were created has been fully identified. Only in this way will we be able to secure a future for the art of the future.

 

Pau Waelder

 

——————-

Notes

[1] Stewart Brand. “Creating Creating”, en WIRED, nº1.01. Marzo-abril, 1993. <http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/1.01/creating.html>

[2] Edward Shanken. Art and Electronic Media. Londres-Nueva York: Phaidon, 2009, 11.

[3] Edward Shanken, op. cit., 11.

[4] Wolf Lieser. The World of Digital Art. Postdam: h.f.Ullmann, 2010, 8.

[5] Boris Groys. “Comrades of Time”, en What is Contemporary Art?. Berlin: Sternberg Press, 2010, 23.

[Texto para el catálogo del festival Art Futura 2011]

 

El arte vinculado a las nuevas tecnologías ha sido denominado frecuentemente como “el arte del futuro”, una definición que pretende ser elogiosa y como tal ha dominado el discurso de esta corriente del arte contemporáneo, siempre ligada a las promesas utópicas de una industria tecnológica en constante desarrollo. La palabra “futuro” se ha convertido así en una etiqueta de uso común por parte de organizaciones, centros y eventos dedicados al encuentro entre arte, tecnología y sociedad: festivales como FutureEverything (antes Futuresonic) en Manchester o Futur en Seine en París y por supuesto Art Futura; el Ars Electronica Center en Linz, autodenominado “museo del futuro”; el Futurelab, laboratorio de investigación y desarrollo de Ars Electronica, o el centro de cultura, tecnología e innovación Oi Futuro de Rio de Janeiro son algunos ejemplos de esta identificación, a los que se suman los títulos de exposiciones y conferencias que prometen de una forma u otra examinar algún aspecto del futuro a través de la creación actual. Sin duda este uso de la palabra “futuro” tiene sentido, a la luz de las innovaciones tecnológicas que aportan muchas de las creaciones presentadas en estos eventos y también de las reflexiones que suscitan acerca de nuestra relación con la tecnología, avanzando o anunciando situaciones que se producirán pasados unos años. De hecho, el rápido desarrollo tecnológico produce un desfase con respecto a la sociedad, que no ha creado aún un marco cultural con el que asimilar sus aportaciones. Este marco lo proporcionan, en definitiva, las obras de arte y nuevos medios, así como las reflexiones de teóricos, investigadores y artistas reunidos en estos foros. No obstante, también es cierto que la apuesta por el futuro implica dirigir la atención hacia lo más “nuevo” o aquello que se encuentra en una fase emergente, prestando menor atención a todo lo que forma parte del pasado.

 

Hace casi veinte años, el escritor Stewart Brand criticaba la aceleración a la que se sometía el arte vinculado a las nuevas tecnologías, centrado en la innovación como único objetivo: “si eres uno de los primeros en trabajar con proyecciones de burbujas psicodélicas, música electrónica, videojuegos de aventuras, realidad virtual o vida artificial, cuentas con la novedad del medio. No hay tradición que superar. La invención se manifiesta en el propio medio. Todo lo que tienes que hacer es jugar, y parece una creación.” [1] Brand advertía que este tipo de creación sin historia estaba abocada a facilitar la aparición de nuevos desarrollos tecnológicos con los que otros artistas crearían sus obras, olvidando los nombres y las aportaciones de los pioneros. Dos décadas más tarde, si bien el arte de nuevos medios sigue en gran medida adscrito a la regla de la innovación constante, también es cierto que el uso de las tecnologías actuales se va normalizando, la carrera de algunos artistas de este ámbito se ha consolidado (mientras otros siguen esperando un merecido reconocimiento) y se multiplican los ensayos que procuran construir una historia del encuentro entre arte, ciencia y tecnología. El deseo de anunciar el futuro se ha serenado a medida que el pasado se ha revelado como una fuente de inspiración y el propio medio ha llegado a una primera madurez. En el contexto actual, el arte del futuro necesita asentar sus raíces en el pasado y vincularse a las corrientes artísticas históricas y contemporáneas, aunque sea para lograr su reconocimiento por parte del mundo del arte. En el prólogo de su libro Art and Electronic Media, el historiador Edward Shanken afirma: “En nuestra época, las tecnologías electrónicas han llegado a ser tan omnipresentes que es difícil imaginar que se pueda producir música contemporánea sin instrumentos eléctricos o imaginar a un autor escribiendo sin la ayuda de un ordenador. Sin embargo, con pocas excepciones, el arte electrónico no ha sido reconocido por los discursos del arte contemporáneo.” [2] Con estas palabras, Shanken incide en que el arte de nuevos medios es en realidad un arte del presente, que emplea las mismas tecnologías que se han hecho imprescindibles en muchas otras esferas de la vida cotidiana. Con todo, señala, este arte ha sido largamente ignorado por el mundo del arte contemporáneo, por lo cual se propone “hacer posible que la rica genealogía del arte y los medios electrónicos en los siglos veinte y veintiuno sea comprendida y vista (en sentido figurado y literal) como un elemento central de las historias del arte y la cultura visual.” [3]

 

Se perfila así otra problemática del arte del futuro, no sólo la posibilidad apuntada por Brand de desarrollarse sin historia, sino la de ser ignorado por el mundo del arte. Según Shanken, la validación del arte de nuevos medios pasa entonces por vincularse a las principales corrientes artísticas, de tal manera que se identifique como una tendencia más del arte contemporáneo. Desde la perspectiva del mercado del arte, el galerista Wolf Lieser apunta no tanto a la historia como a la vinculación de este arte con el momento presente: “Las pinturas y fotos aún logran precios destacados en el mercado del arte, pero ¿son realmente fuentes de inspiración para el día de hoy y el mañana? Comparado con otras formas de expresión artística, el ordenador es una herramienta bastante nueva y un medio que ha transformado nuestra cultura como ningún otro en las últimas décadas. El arte digital es polifacético y sorprendente. Corresponde a nuestro tiempo.” [4] Según Lieser, por tanto, el arte de nuevos medios puede tener incluso más valor que otras manifestaciones artísticas por su mayor vinculación con la cultura contemporánea, un argumento basado en que el arte contemporáneo afirma su validez en su vinculación con el presente. El discurso principal del arte contemporáneo se centra el presente más absoluto, en lo más actual. En este sentido, como señala el historiador Boris Groys: “el arte parece ser realmente contemporáneo si es auténtico, si por ejemplo captura y expresa la presencia del presente de una manera radicalmente incorrupta por las tradiciones pasadas y las estrategias que conducen al éxito en el futuro.” [5] Partiendo de la idea expresada por Groys, el arte de nuevos medios no puede por tanto ser un arte del futuro si quiere a la vez identificarse con el arte contemporáneo. Por ello, como señalan Shanken y Lieser, entendemos que en realidad se trata de un arte del presente, del encuentro actual entre arte y tecnología. Si bien, como hemos apuntado, en muchas ocasiones esta tecnología está tan avanzada que no hemos visto aún sus implicaciones, si no que estas se proyectan en nuestra imaginación hacia el futuro.

 

Paradójicamente, la continuidad del arte del futuro puede depender de que se identifique como arte contemporáneo. Al integrarse en el mundo del arte, el arte de nuevos medios no sólo consigue ser reconocido y estudiado, si no que también gana presencia en el mercado, y por tanto pasa a formar parte de colecciones privadas y públicas. Las obras se conciben cada vez menos como experimentos que se muestran durante unos días en un festival y más como piezas que deben tener una estabilidad y fiabilidad suficiente como para ser expuestas de forma permanente. Los museos y fundaciones que adquieren estas piezas deben ocuparse también de mantenerlas y, en caso necesario, actualizarlas cuando la tecnología que las sustenta quede obsoleta. La conservación de las obras requiere además una documentación exhaustiva, lo cual permite disponer de una mayor información acerca del trabajo del artista que será de gran utilidad a los historiadores del futuro. Por otra parte, el estudio del pasado de este arte permite trazar sus fundamentos y reconocer el trabajo de los pioneros, cuyas aportaciones no se pierden en el “agujero negro de la tecnología”, como lo define Stewart Brand, refiriéndose al proceso de obsolescencia acelerada que en su opinión llevaría a un arte de nuevos medios sin historia ni artistas. Resulta extraño que el llamado “arte del futuro” se vea más amenazado en su continuidad que el que consideramos “arte del presente”, pero de hecho son sus características más destacadas (experimentación con nuevos recursos tecnológicos, medios y relaciones entre espectador y obra; ruptura con los modelos tradicionales de exposición y distribución de la obra de arte; creación de un proceso en vez de una pieza acabada…) las que se convierten en debilidades al tratar de integrar este tipo de creación artística en las rígidas estructuras del mundo del arte. El reto, por tanto, consiste en crear y mantener un ecosistema para el arte de nuevos medios, fomentar su estudio y comprensión, trazar su genealogía y reconocer las aportaciones de los artistas pioneros, cuyas obras sólo podrán ser apreciadas tras identificarse el contexto en el que fueron creadas. Solo así lograremos asegurar un futuro para el arte del futuro.

 

Pau Waelder

 

——————-

Notas

[1] Stewart Brand. “Creating Creating”, en WIRED, nº1.01. Marzo-abril, 1993. <http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/1.01/creating.html>

[2] Edward Shanken. Art and Electronic Media. Londres-Nueva York: Phaidon, 2009, 11.

[3] Edward Shanken, op. cit., 11.

[4] Wolf Lieser. The World of Digital Art. Postdam: h.f.Ullmann, 2010, 8.

[5] Boris Groys. “Comrades of Time”, en What is Contemporary Art?. Berlin: Sternberg Press, 2010, 23.

[Text per al catàleg del festival Art Futura 2011]

 

El arte vinculado a las nuevas tecnologías ha sido denominado frecuentemente como “el arte del futuro”, una definición que pretende ser elogiosa y como tal ha dominado el discurso de esta corriente del arte contemporáneo, siempre ligada a las promesas utópicas de una industria tecnológica en constante desarrollo. La palabra “futuro” se ha convertido así en una etiqueta de uso común por parte de organizaciones, centros y eventos dedicados al encuentro entre arte, tecnología y sociedad: festivales como FutureEverything (antes Futuresonic) en Manchester o Futur en Seine en París y por supuesto Art Futura; el Ars Electronica Center en Linz, autodenominado “museo del futuro”; el Futurelab, laboratorio de investigación y desarrollo de Ars Electronica, o el centro de cultura, tecnología e innovación Oi Futuro de Rio de Janeiro son algunos ejemplos de esta identificación, a los que se suman los títulos de exposiciones y conferencias que prometen de una forma u otra examinar algún aspecto del futuro a través de la creación actual. Sin duda este uso de la palabra “futuro” tiene sentido, a la luz de las innovaciones tecnológicas que aportan muchas de las creaciones presentadas en estos eventos y también de las reflexiones que suscitan acerca de nuestra relación con la tecnología, avanzando o anunciando situaciones que se producirán pasados unos años. De hecho, el rápido desarrollo tecnológico produce un desfase con respecto a la sociedad, que no ha creado aún un marco cultural con el que asimilar sus aportaciones. Este marco lo proporcionan, en definitiva, las obras de arte y nuevos medios, así como las reflexiones de teóricos, investigadores y artistas reunidos en estos foros. No obstante, también es cierto que la apuesta por el futuro implica dirigir la atención hacia lo más “nuevo” o aquello que se encuentra en una fase emergente, prestando menor atención a todo lo que forma parte del pasado.

 

Hace casi veinte años, el escritor Stewart Brand criticaba la aceleración a la que se sometía el arte vinculado a las nuevas tecnologías, centrado en la innovación como único objetivo: “si eres uno de los primeros en trabajar con proyecciones de burbujas psicodélicas, música electrónica, videojuegos de aventuras, realidad virtual o vida artificial, cuentas con la novedad del medio. No hay tradición que superar. La invención se manifiesta en el propio medio. Todo lo que tienes que hacer es jugar, y parece una creación.” [1] Brand advertía que este tipo de creación sin historia estaba abocada a facilitar la aparición de nuevos desarrollos tecnológicos con los que otros artistas crearían sus obras, olvidando los nombres y las aportaciones de los pioneros. Dos décadas más tarde, si bien el arte de nuevos medios sigue en gran medida adscrito a la regla de la innovación constante, también es cierto que el uso de las tecnologías actuales se va normalizando, la carrera de algunos artistas de este ámbito se ha consolidado (mientras otros siguen esperando un merecido reconocimiento) y se multiplican los ensayos que procuran construir una historia del encuentro entre arte, ciencia y tecnología. El deseo de anunciar el futuro se ha serenado a medida que el pasado se ha revelado como una fuente de inspiración y el propio medio ha llegado a una primera madurez. En el contexto actual, el arte del futuro necesita asentar sus raíces en el pasado y vincularse a las corrientes artísticas históricas y contemporáneas, aunque sea para lograr su reconocimiento por parte del mundo del arte. En el prólogo de su libro Art and Electronic Media, el historiador Edward Shanken afirma: “En nuestra época, las tecnologías electrónicas han llegado a ser tan omnipresentes que es difícil imaginar que se pueda producir música contemporánea sin instrumentos eléctricos o imaginar a un autor escribiendo sin la ayuda de un ordenador. Sin embargo, con pocas excepciones, el arte electrónico no ha sido reconocido por los discursos del arte contemporáneo.” [2] Con estas palabras, Shanken incide en que el arte de nuevos medios es en realidad un arte del presente, que emplea las mismas tecnologías que se han hecho imprescindibles en muchas otras esferas de la vida cotidiana. Con todo, señala, este arte ha sido largamente ignorado por el mundo del arte contemporáneo, por lo cual se propone “hacer posible que la rica genealogía del arte y los medios electrónicos en los siglos veinte y veintiuno sea comprendida y vista (en sentido figurado y literal) como un elemento central de las historias del arte y la cultura visual.” [3]

 

Se perfila así otra problemática del arte del futuro, no sólo la posibilidad apuntada por Brand de desarrollarse sin historia, sino la de ser ignorado por el mundo del arte. Según Shanken, la validación del arte de nuevos medios pasa entonces por vincularse a las principales corrientes artísticas, de tal manera que se identifique como una tendencia más del arte contemporáneo. Desde la perspectiva del mercado del arte, el galerista Wolf Lieser apunta no tanto a la historia como a la vinculación de este arte con el momento presente: “Las pinturas y fotos aún logran precios destacados en el mercado del arte, pero ¿son realmente fuentes de inspiración para el día de hoy y el mañana? Comparado con otras formas de expresión artística, el ordenador es una herramienta bastante nueva y un medio que ha transformado nuestra cultura como ningún otro en las últimas décadas. El arte digital es polifacético y sorprendente. Corresponde a nuestro tiempo.” [4] Según Lieser, por tanto, el arte de nuevos medios puede tener incluso más valor que otras manifestaciones artísticas por su mayor vinculación con la cultura contemporánea, un argumento basado en que el arte contemporáneo afirma su validez en su vinculación con el presente. El discurso principal del arte contemporáneo se centra el presente más absoluto, en lo más actual. En este sentido, como señala el historiador Boris Groys: “el arte parece ser realmente contemporáneo si es auténtico, si por ejemplo captura y expresa la presencia del presente de una manera radicalmente incorrupta por las tradiciones pasadas y las estrategias que conducen al éxito en el futuro.” [5] Partiendo de la idea expresada por Groys, el arte de nuevos medios no puede por tanto ser un arte del futuro si quiere a la vez identificarse con el arte contemporáneo. Por ello, como señalan Shanken y Lieser, entendemos que en realidad se trata de un arte del presente, del encuentro actual entre arte y tecnología. Si bien, como hemos apuntado, en muchas ocasiones esta tecnología está tan avanzada que no hemos visto aún sus implicaciones, si no que estas se proyectan en nuestra imaginación hacia el futuro.

 

Paradójicamente, la continuidad del arte del futuro puede depender de que se identifique como arte contemporáneo. Al integrarse en el mundo del arte, el arte de nuevos medios no sólo consigue ser reconocido y estudiado, si no que también gana presencia en el mercado, y por tanto pasa a formar parte de colecciones privadas y públicas. Las obras se conciben cada vez menos como experimentos que se muestran durante unos días en un festival y más como piezas que deben tener una estabilidad y fiabilidad suficiente como para ser expuestas de forma permanente. Los museos y fundaciones que adquieren estas piezas deben ocuparse también de mantenerlas y, en caso necesario, actualizarlas cuando la tecnología que las sustenta quede obsoleta. La conservación de las obras requiere además una documentación exhaustiva, lo cual permite disponer de una mayor información acerca del trabajo del artista que será de gran utilidad a los historiadores del futuro. Por otra parte, el estudio del pasado de este arte permite trazar sus fundamentos y reconocer el trabajo de los pioneros, cuyas aportaciones no se pierden en el “agujero negro de la tecnología”, como lo define Stewart Brand, refiriéndose al proceso de obsolescencia acelerada que en su opinión llevaría a un arte de nuevos medios sin historia ni artistas. Resulta extraño que el llamado “arte del futuro” se vea más amenazado en su continuidad que el que consideramos “arte del presente”, pero de hecho son sus características más destacadas (experimentación con nuevos recursos tecnológicos, medios y relaciones entre espectador y obra; ruptura con los modelos tradicionales de exposición y distribución de la obra de arte; creación de un proceso en vez de una pieza acabada…) las que se convierten en debilidades al tratar de integrar este tipo de creación artística en las rígidas estructuras del mundo del arte. El reto, por tanto, consiste en crear y mantener un ecosistema para el arte de nuevos medios, fomentar su estudio y comprensión, trazar su genealogía y reconocer las aportaciones de los artistas pioneros, cuyas obras sólo podrán ser apreciadas tras identificarse el contexto en el que fueron creadas. Solo así lograremos asegurar un futuro para el arte del futuro.

 

Pau Waelder

 

——————-

Notas

[1] Stewart Brand. “Creating Creating”, en WIRED, nº1.01. Marzo-abril, 1993. <http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/1.01/creating.html>

[2] Edward Shanken. Art and Electronic Media. Londres-Nueva York: Phaidon, 2009, 11.

[3] Edward Shanken, op. cit., 11.

[4] Wolf Lieser. The World of Digital Art. Postdam: h.f.Ullmann, 2010, 8.

[5] Boris Groys. “Comrades of Time”, en What is Contemporary Art?. Berlin: Sternberg Press, 2010, 23.