Interviews, Writing

28/09/2012

Lynn Hershman Leeson: Excavating Histories

Tags: , ,

Article published in art.es, #51 (2012)
Media Art section

 

Lynn Hershman Leeson is an artist and filmmaker [1] who has pioneered interactive and net-based art. Spanning over four decades, her work has focused on themes such as identity, privacy, the media and the relationship between humans and machines, in a time in which both women and technology have become increasingly influential in our society. Despite its groundbreaking contributions, Hershman’s work has not been widely recognized until recently with several prestigious awards and grants. Among them is the |DDAA| DAM Digital Art Award [2], which recognized in 2010 the artist’s career and her contributions to the development of new media art. On the occasion of this award, a survey exhibition of Hershman’s work is taking place this year at the Kunsthalle Bremen, under the title Seducing Time.

 

You once stated that “being a pioneer is being on the front lines and you get arrows in your back”. How do you feel nowadays about being a pioneer? Has your work been properly recognized?

Perhaps the legacy of pioneers is to be foot soldiers of the future; to dodge and/or endure the landmines of uncharted territories, including the isolation and loneliness  that are inevitably part of remapping any terrain.

Properly recognized? By whom? When? Let’s ask that same question in 50 years. My work is about time. And process. And history. And excavating histories. Some of my works have taken nearly 40 years to be noticed. I revel in the unrepentant thrill of doing what seems right, with the assumption that time will catch up to the choices and the effect some of this work has and will have. And in the meantime trudge ahead, having great fun in the process.

 

You started working at a time in which women where beginning to find their own identity, which is one of the subjects of your work. Has this been more inspired by the use of technology or your condition as a woman artist?

I think it is fair to say that in the 1970’s, women simply didn’t know they had a history and consequently were living on borrowed autonomy, inauthentic identity and marginal space in which to be effective. Once that realization hit, there was no choice but to reinvent that precious past, as it was the engine that fueled the future. As for technology, women have been tremendously influential in it’s formation, birth and shape (consider, for instance, Ada Lovelace, Mary Shelley or Hedy Lamarr).

I am not certain I can separate being female and the verve I feel around technology. They are intermeshed, like DNA strands. However, I do love to “correct” and revise cultural conditioning as seen through individuals, and using technologies to expand those possibilities globally. To call attention to loss of privacy, surveillance strategies, the subtleties of censorship that impinge on freedom and releasing inhibitions falsely placed on marginal communities which occasionally include women and technology. Technology has the potential to redefine borders, creating porous flows of information that negates cultural or societal restrictions.

 

You stated once that “new technology has no history”. Do you consider that we have reached an awareness of the historical evolution of art and technology?

No, I do not think we have a clue of the expansive ways that historical evolution is, well, evolving. Most people live in the past, or don’t push for the information that is readily available. We are at a tipping point both as a globe and a species, and it will be up to technologies, and visionary thinkers to find a way we will survive. The real history, the underground story has still not been written. I believe in the future and younger generations, and they surely will find it, and exploit all those holes in space, negative entropies, and unexcavated archeologies waiting to be recognized and brought into light.

 

You have also worked with photography, video art and film. Has your work in these relatively more established fields been better understood than your interactive and telematic works?

I think that percentage wise, my work is appreciated equally in each genre. There is a huge global audience for film, but I make small independent hybrid works that are finding a unique boutique audience. Same in photography. Or networked pieces. They are seen in varying venues that have their own expandable audience. But even small audiences can be fabulous, if they are affected by what they see. Size in this case doesn’t matter.  And it’s generally the younger people who most “get” or understand the work. At a Q and A for the film Teknolust, Tilda Swinton noted that I do not make first weekend films, but rather the films I made are seen in cult like venues for decades. The most compelling reason to make something is that it can make a difference. I think much of my work has done that, and those instances where the chance can be measured is very gratifying.

 

Some of your pioneering works, such as Lorna, Deep Contact or America’s Finest, have been migrated to newer technologies. Have you modified them at all while updating them?

I migrated all of these works in 2008, and they continue to be fully functional. In the migration, I retain the flaws, the clumsiness, and pay attention to the authenticity of the mistakes that were originally made. It would be easy to have them work “better and faster” and audiences nowadays get impatient with works that are so awkward, but it would have not been honest to upgrade them smoother. They are viewed like they did when they were first seen, flaws and all. The remote switch in Lorna takes time to change a channel but time and waiting are an important element. I plan to continue to update works and have manuals for their retention for at least the next 50 years.  Museums and collectors who have trusted this work deserve that. I am very fortunate to have great programmers I work with: Colin Klingman, Palle Henkel, GianPablo Villamil,  All brilliant, all kind. I could not do this alone.

 

In !Women Art Revolution, you explore the history of feminist art in America and expose the discrimination against women in the art world. Is the art world more equitable now?

I think we have moved forward maybe 3%. It is absolutely not equitable nowadays.  Neither is the film world. In 2012 there has not been a single woman nominated or shortlisted for an academy award, or accepted into competition at Cannes. Women’s art sells for less and is not as readily available. Thankfully though, there are some enlightened philanthropists who are inventing new models to make long term change and have a zeal and determination for gender equity. Ultimately, I think it will be up to the next generation to accomplish real equity and all the psychological shifts that go with that. Women have not been properly appreciated across the board, in any media, including new media. I think that exclusion is an endemic cultural disease.

 

In Seducing Time your work is exhibited alongside the artworks of the Kunsthalle Bremen’s collection. How would you describe this interaction?

I LOVED IT!!!! I think the curator, Katja Riemer, did a terrific job placing works about voyeurism or nakedness together.  I think it enhances both pieces to see the integration of time on ideas. A painting about voyeurism made in the 19th century “speaks to” a piece I did on “gazing” or a naked sex doll that looks like Olympia. I do not really believe in separate spaces for anything. We are all part of a collective community after all, and separation again goes into margins. But then again, seams between time is important and essential even. I love fraying seams and exposing the threads, having them tantalizingly hang between a presumed edge, whenever possible.

 

 

Pau Waelder

 

————————–

 

Notes:

[1] The Art and Films of Lynn Hershman Leeson.

[2] |DDAA| DAM Digital Art Award

 

 

 

Artículo publicado en art.es, #51 (2012)
Sección Media Art

Lynn Hershman Leeson es una artista y cineasta [1] pionera en el ámbito del arte interactivo y el arte en la Red. A lo largo de cuatro décadas, su trabajo se ha centrado en temas tales como la identidad, la intimidad, los medios de comunicación y la relación entre humanos y máquinas, en una época en la tanto las mujeres como la tecnología han visto crecer su influencia en la sociedad. A pesar de sus innovadoras aportaciones, la obra de Hershman no ha sido ampliamente reconocida hasta hace poco, con diversos premios y becas de reconocido prestigio, entre los cuales el |DDAA| DAM Digital Art Award [2], otorgado en 2010 en reconocimiento a la carrera de la artista y sus aportaciones al desarrollo del media art. Con motivo de este premio, la Kunsthalle de Bremen acoge este año una exposición del trabajo de Hershman, bajo el título Seducing Time.

Una vez afirmó que “ser una pionera es estar en primera línea, recibiendo flechas en la espalda”. ¿Cómo se siente hoy en día acerca de esta condición? ¿Ha obtenido su obra un reconocimento adecuado?

Tal vez el legado de los pioneros es ser la infantería del futuro: evitar o superar los campos minados de los territorios inexplorados, incluyendo el aislamiento y la soledad que forman parte inevitablemente de la labor de cartografiar un terreno.

¿Un reconocimiento adecuado? ¿Por quién? ¿Cuando? Formulemos esta misma pregunta dentro de 50 años. Mi obra trata del tiempo. Y el proceso. Y la historia. Y de excavar historias. Algunas de mis obras han tardado 40 años en ser reconocidas. Me deleito con la emoción impenitente que me provoca hacer lo que considero correcto, con la convicción de que con el tiempo se verán las elecciones que he hecho y el efecto que esta obra tiene y tendrá. Y mientras tanto, sigo adelante, y me divierto mucho con el proceso.

Empezó a trabajar en un momento en el que las mujeres empezaban a encontrar su propia identidad, que es uno de los temas de su trabajo. ¿Le ha inspirado más  su uso de la tecnología o su condición como mujer artista?

Creo que es just afirmar que en los 70 las mujeres no sabían que tenían una historia y por tanto vivían con una autonomía prestada, una identidad falsa y un espacio marginal en el que ser efectivas. Una vez se dieron cuenta de ello, no había más remedio que reinventar aquel valioso pasado, puesto que era el motor del futuro. Respecto a la tecnología, las mujeres han marcado enormemente su formación, génesis y características (pensemos, por ejemplo, en Ada Lovelace, Mary Shelley o Hedy Lamarr).

No estoy segura de poder separar el hecho de ser mujer y la pasión que siento por la tecnología. Están entrelazados, como cadenas de ADN. No obstante, me encanta “corregir” y revisar el condicionamiento cultural que se percibe en las personas, y emplear tecnologías para expandir esas posibilidades a nivel global. Llamar la atención acerca de la pérdida de privacidad, las estrategias de vigilancia, las sutilezas de la censura que vulnera la libertad y liberarse de las inhibiciones que se aplican falsamente a las comunidades marginales que en ocasiones incluyen a las mujeres y la tecnología. La tecnología tiene el potencial para redefinir fronteras, crear flujos de información porosos que niegan toda restricción cultural o social.

En una ocasión afirmó que “la nueva tecnología no tiene historia”. ¿Somos conscientes hoy en día de la evolución histórica del arte y la tecnología?

No, creo que no tenemos ni idea de las maneras en las que la evolución histórica está, bueno, evolucionando. La mayoría de la gente vive en el pasado, o no busca la información que está disponible actualmente. Estamos en un punto de inflexión como planeta y especie, y dependerá de las tecnologías, y los pensadores visionarios, encontrar un camino para nuestra supervivencia. La historia real, la historia enterrada aún no ha sido escrita. Creo en el futuro y en las generaciones más jóvenes, seguro que encontrarán esos agujeros en el espacio, entropías negativas y arqueologías no excavadas que esperan ser reconocidas y mostradas.

También ha trabajado con fotografía, videoarte y cine. ¿Se ha entendido mejor su trabajo en estos géneros relativamente más aceptados que sus obras interactivas y telemáticas?

Creo que a nivel porcentual mi trabajo se aprecia de forma equitativa en cada género. El cine cuenta con un gran público a nivel global, pero yo creo pequeñas obras independientes e híbridas que llegan a un público selecto. Lo mismo ocurre con la fotografía, o las obras en la Red. Se muestran en lugares que tienen su propio público. Pero incluso un público minoritario puede ser fabuloso, si le afecta lo que ve. En este caso, el tamaño no importa. Suelen ser los jóvenes los que “captan” o entienden mi obra. En una presentación de Teknolust, Tilda Swinton indicó que yo no ruedo films de taquilla sino que los films que creo se ven en espacios cultos durante décadas. La mejor razón para hacer algo es que pueda marcar una diferencia. Creo que gran parte de mi trabajo lo ha conseguido, y en los casos en que se puede ver son muy gratificantes.

Algunas de sus obras pioneras, com Lorna, Deep Contact o America’s Finest, han sido migradas a nuevas tecnologías. ¿Las ha modificado cuando las actualizaba?

He migrado todas estas obras en 2008, y siguen funcionando perfectamente. En la migración conservo los fallos, la torpeza, y presto atención a la autenticidad de los errores que hice en la pieza original. Sería sencillo hacer que funcionen “mejor y más rápido” y hoy en día el público se impacienta con las obras que funcionan mal, pero no sería honesto hacerlas mejor. Se experimentan como la primera vez, con todos sus fallos. El control remoto de Lorna tarda en cambiar de canal, pero el tiempo y la espera son elementos importantes. Tengo previsto continuar actualizando las obras y tener manuales para su mantenimiento durante al menos 50 años más. Los museos y coleccionistas que han confiado en mi obra lo merecen. Me siento afortunada por contar con grandes programadores, todos ellos brillantes y amables: Colin Klingman, Palle Henkel y GianPablo Villamil. No podría hacerlo sola.

En !Women Art Revolution, explora la historia del arte feminista en EE.UU. y expone la discriminación hacia las mujeres en el mundo del arte. ¿Hay más igualdad ahora? 

Creo que hemos avanzado, tal vez un 3%. Hoy en día no es en absoluto igualitario. Tampoco lo es la industria cinematográfica. En 2012 no se ha nominado a ninguna mujer en los Óscar ni en Cannes. El arte hecho por mujeres se vende a menor precio y no está tan disponible. Por suerte, algunos filántropos visionarios están creando nuevos modelos para hacer cambios a largo plazo y están comprometidos con la igualdad entre géneros. Por último, creo que depende de la próxima generación lograr una igualdad real y todos los cambios psicológicos que la acompañan. Las mujeres no han sido adecuadamente reconocidas en ningún medio, tampoco en el media art. Creo que esta exclusión es una enfermedad cultural endémica.

En Seducing Time su obra se expone junto a las obras de la colección de la Kunsthalle de Bremen. ¿Cómo describiría esta interacción?

¡ME ENCANTA! Creo que la comisaria, Katja Riemer, hizo un trabajo magnífico al colocar obras acerca del voyeurismo y la desnudez unas junto a otras. Creo que las obras se benefician de esta integración de tiempo e ideas. Una pintura que trata acerca del voyeurismo creada en el siglo XIX “conversa” con una obra que hice acerca de la mirada o una muñeca desnuda que se parece a Olimpia. No creo que deban existir espacios separados para nada. Todos formamos parte de una comunidad, y la separación lleva a la marginación. Pero al mismo tiempo, las separaciones temporales son importantes e incluso esenciales. Me encanta deshilachar las costuras y mostrar los hilos, hacer que cuelguen en los supuestos bordes, siempre que sea posible.

Pau Waelder

————————–

Notas:

[1] The Art and Films of Lynn Hershman Leeson. <http://www.lynnhershman.com/>

[2] |DDAA| DAM Digital Art Award <http://www.ddaa-online.org/>

Article publicat en castellà i anglès a art.es, #51 (2012)
Secció Media Art

 

Lynn Hershman Leeson es una artista y cineasta [1] pionera en el ámbito del arte interactivo y el arte en la Red. A lo largo de cuatro décadas, su trabajo se ha centrado en temas tales como la identidad, la intimidad, los medios de comunicación y la relación entre humanos y máquinas, en una época en la tanto las mujeres como la tecnología han visto crecer su influencia en la sociedad. A pesar de sus innovadoras aportaciones, la obra de Hershman no ha sido ampliamente reconocida hasta hace poco, con diversos premios y becas de reconocido prestigio, entre los cuales el |DDAA| DAM Digital Art Award [2], otorgado en 2010 en reconocimiento a la carrera de la artista y sus aportaciones al desarrollo del media art. Con motivo de este premio, la Kunsthalle de Bremen acoge este año una exposición del trabajo de Hershman, bajo el título Seducing Time.

Una vez afirmó que “ser una pionera es estar en primera línea, recibiendo flechas en la espalda”. ¿Cómo se siente hoy en día acerca de esta condición? ¿Ha obtenido su obra un reconocimento adecuado?

Tal vez el legado de los pioneros es ser la infantería del futuro: evitar o superar los campos minados de los territorios inexplorados, incluyendo el aislamiento y la soledad que forman parte inevitablemente de la labor de cartografiar un terreno.

¿Un reconocimiento adecuado? ¿Por quién? ¿Cuando? Formulemos esta misma pregunta dentro de 50 años. Mi obra trata del tiempo. Y el proceso. Y la historia. Y de excavar historias. Algunas de mis obras han tardado 40 años en ser reconocidas. Me deleito con la emoción impenitente que me provoca hacer lo que considero correcto, con la convicción de que con el tiempo se verán las elecciones que he hecho y el efecto que esta obra tiene y tendrá. Y mientras tanto, sigo adelante, y me divierto mucho con el proceso.

 

Empezó a trabajar en un momento en el que las mujeres empezaban a encontrar su propia identidad, que es uno de los temas de su trabajo. ¿Le ha inspirado más  su uso de la tecnología o su condición como mujer artista?

Creo que es just afirmar que en los 70 las mujeres no sabían que tenían una historia y por tanto vivían con una autonomía prestada, una identidad falsa y un espacio marginal en el que ser efectivas. Una vez se dieron cuenta de ello, no había más remedio que reinventar aquel valioso pasado, puesto que era el motor del futuro. Respecto a la tecnología, las mujeres han marcado enormemente su formación, génesis y características (pensemos, por ejemplo, en Ada Lovelace, Mary Shelley o Hedy Lamarr).

No estoy segura de poder separar el hecho de ser mujer y la pasión que siento por la tecnología. Están entrelazados, como cadenas de ADN. No obstante, me encanta “corregir” y revisar el condicionamiento cultural que se percibe en las personas, y emplear tecnologías para expandir esas posibilidades a nivel global. Llamar la atención acerca de la pérdida de privacidad, las estrategias de vigilancia, las sutilezas de la censura que vulnera la libertad y liberarse de las inhibiciones que se aplican falsamente a las comunidades marginales que en ocasiones incluyen a las mujeres y la tecnología. La tecnología tiene el potencial para redefinir fronteras, crear flujos de información porosos que niegan toda restricción cultural o social.

 

En una ocasión afirmó que “la nueva tecnología no tiene historia”. ¿Somos conscientes hoy en día de la evolución histórica del arte y la tecnología?

No, creo que no tenemos ni idea de las maneras en las que la evolución histórica está, bueno, evolucionando. La mayoría de la gente vive en el pasado, o no busca la información que está disponible actualmente. Estamos en un punto de inflexión como planeta y especie, y dependerá de las tecnologías, y los pensadores visionarios, encontrar un camino para nuestra supervivencia. La historia real, la historia enterrada aún no ha sido escrita. Creo en el futuro y en las generaciones más jóvenes, seguro que encontrarán esos agujeros en el espacio, entropías negativas y arqueologías no excavadas que esperan ser reconocidas y mostradas.

 

También ha trabajado con fotografía, videoarte y cine. ¿Se ha entendido mejor su trabajo en estos géneros relativamente más aceptados que sus obras interactivas y telemáticas?

Creo que a nivel porcentual mi trabajo se aprecia de forma equitativa en cada género. El cine cuenta con un gran público a nivel global, pero yo creo pequeñas obras independientes e híbridas que llegan a un público selecto. Lo mismo ocurre con la fotografía, o las obras en la Red. Se muestran en lugares que tienen su propio público. Pero incluso un público minoritario puede ser fabuloso, si le afecta lo que ve. En este caso, el tamaño no importa. Suelen ser los jóvenes los que “captan” o entienden mi obra. En una presentación de Teknolust, Tilda Swinton indicó que yo no ruedo films de taquilla sino que los films que creo se ven en espacios cultos durante décadas. La mejor razón para hacer algo es que pueda marcar una diferencia. Creo que gran parte de mi trabajo lo ha conseguido, y en los casos en que se puede ver son muy gratificantes.

 

Algunas de sus obras pioneras, com Lorna, Deep Contact o America’s Finest, han sido migradas a nuevas tecnologías. ¿Las ha modificado cuando las actualizaba?

He migrado todas estas obras en 2008, y siguen funcionando perfectamente. En la migración conservo los fallos, la torpeza, y presto atención a la autenticidad de los errores que hice en la pieza original. Sería sencillo hacer que funcionen “mejor y más rápido” y hoy en día el público se impacienta con las obras que funcionan mal, pero no sería honesto hacerlas mejor. Se experimentan como la primera vez, con todos sus fallos. El control remoto de Lorna tarda en cambiar de canal, pero el tiempo y la espera son elementos importantes. Tengo previsto continuar actualizando las obras y tener manuales para su mantenimiento durante al menos 50 años más. Los museos y coleccionistas que han confiado en mi obra lo merecen. Me siento afortunada por contar con grandes programadores, todos ellos brillantes y amables: Colin Klingman, Palle Henkel y GianPablo Villamil. No podría hacerlo sola.

 

En !Women Art Revolution, explora la historia del arte feminista en EE.UU. y expone la discriminación hacia las mujeres en el mundo del arte. ¿Hay más igualdad ahora? 

Creo que hemos avanzado, tal vez un 3%. Hoy en día no es en absoluto igualitario. Tampoco lo es la industria cinematográfica. En 2012 no se ha nominado a ninguna mujer en los Óscar ni en Cannes. El arte hecho por mujeres se vende a menor precio y no está tan disponible. Por suerte, algunos filántropos visionarios están creando nuevos modelos para hacer cambios a largo plazo y están comprometidos con la igualdad entre géneros. Por último, creo que depende de la próxima generación lograr una igualdad real y todos los cambios psicológicos que la acompañan. Las mujeres no han sido adecuadamente reconocidas en ningún medio, tampoco en el media art. Creo que esta exclusión es una enfermedad cultural endémica.

 

En Seducing Time su obra se expone junto a las obras de la colección de la Kunsthalle de Bremen. ¿Cómo describiría esta interacción?

¡ME ENCANTA! Creo que la comisaria, Katja Riemer, hizo un trabajo magnífico al colocar obras acerca del voyeurismo y la desnudez unas junto a otras. Creo que las obras se benefician de esta integración de tiempo e ideas. Una pintura que trata acerca del voyeurismo creada en el siglo XIX “conversa” con una obra que hice acerca de la mirada o una muñeca desnuda que se parece a Olimpia. No creo que deban existir espacios separados para nada. Todos formamos parte de una comunidad, y la separación lleva a la marginación. Pero al mismo tiempo, las separaciones temporales son importantes e incluso esenciales. Me encanta deshilachar las costuras y mostrar los hilos, hacer que cuelguen en los supuestos bordes, siempre que sea posible.

 

Pau Waelder

 

————————–

 

Notas:

[1] The Art and Films of Lynn Hershman Leeson.

[2] |DDAA| DAM Digital Art Award