Books, Writing

15/11/2012

Our culture is digital

[Text written for the catalogue of the Art Futura festival, 2012. Translated from Spanish by Art Futura staff] 

 

In a recently published text, Howard Rheingold suggests the possibility of achieving an expansion of human intelligence using digital tools we commonly use and suggests that such devices have already transformed the way we think. Quoting Andy Clark, Rheingold says that we are “born cyborgs” as this term describes not only the insertion of technological devices in the body but “people whose brains are not physically jacked in to a computer (yet) but whose nervous systems are (already) attuned […] to a kind of “thinking” possible only with computers”. These words remind definitely the science fiction future described by William Gibson in his novel Neuromancer (1984), whose protagonist, hacker Henry Dorsett Case, connects his brain to cyberspace via a neural implant. But one doesn’t need to evoke a dystopian future to find already the human-machine fusion that occurs at a cognitive and social level.

In recent decades, the rapid development of new technology has brought profound changes in our global society. The way we live, work, communicate and create our image of the world is increasingly dependent on digital tools we use every day. These tools not only provide us with previously unavailable resources (information in real time, virtual environments, and instant communication without distances), but determine, through their interfaces, the appearance of an environment to which we devote most of our hours waking.

The way these new ways of documenting our experiences, create and communicate have spread in industrialized societies and the speed with which they have become part of all areas of our daily lives have led us to a situation where as Charlie Gere indicated: “there is not and can’t be a point outside the media from which we can have a privileged perspective and free of preconceptions about any aspect of our existence, and even less about the media itself” [2].

A decade ago, Gere noted the increasing presence of new technologies in contemporary society and proposed, on the basis of this observation, “the existence of a distinctive digital culture, in that the term digital can stand for a particular way of life of a group or groups of people at a certain period in history […] Digitality can be thought of as a marker of culture because it encompasses both the artefacts and the systems of signification and communication that most clearly demarcate our contemporary way of life from others”[3].

The influence of technological media marks therefore the existence of a digital culture, since the way we communicate, relate, consume, create and share cultural products is determined by the use of digital tools, data networks and other devices.

The rapid pace with which changes have occurred leading to the identification of a digital culture certainly poses great difficulties in developing a clear reflection of its influence, let alone raise their long-term consequences. But surely we can see, as stated by Pau Alsina, that we’ve gone from the digitization of culture to digital culture, meaning that we are no longer at the time that the manifestations are translated into bits, but that these already occur defined digital by tools, not only as mere representations on a screen that replaces the paper, but as new forms of creation, distribution and reception of culture, where there is no longer an assigned static role of producers and consumers, but both are in a complex web of mutual influences that occur with no little friction.

The very concept of culture is transformed: As indicated by Alsina, “it is appropriate to think of culture as a dynamic process and not as an unchanging essence that must be defended. Culture, understood as a dynamic system formed by flows of information, people and products, takes different forms that respond to dynamic models of relationship between individuals, societies and territories “[4].

In this conception of culture as a system of relations, we surely owe to the new technologies the configuration of the ways that it manifests itself, but at the same time it must be recognized that digital culture itself generates the use of new technological devices. So, we can say, with Charlie Gere, that new technologies are a product of digital culture [5]: Digital tools open new possibilities, but when it makes a real difference is when its use is so commonplace as to be virtually invisible. Clay Shirky points out that is not the more innovative devices that introduce large changes in society, but the commonly used tools such as email, mobile phones or websites. Precisely those are the tools that a large part of the population uses in everyday life, and have facilitated the mass mobilization of the Arab Spring in 2010 and the 15-M movement in Spain since 2011. “The Revolution”, Shirky reminds us, “doesn’t happen when society adopts new technologies —it happens when society adopts new behaviors” [6].

 

Increasingly ubiquitous, while necessary, technology has become invisible and integrated naturally in our everyday landscape. The above examples indicate the paradoxical situation in which the technological media form an inseparable part of our culture, at the same time that they stop being outstanding. Watching a video on YouTube, we focus on the content but often we ignore the means that make it possible to reach our screen, from the personal computer, through a server platform video to the Internet to the tools, for example, that have allowed a group of teenagers to make a short film with special effects that a few years ago were only available from a major studio film.

If, in the last decades of the twentieth century, we celebrated the creation of a new culture around the digital, full of utopian dreams and spurred by the constant appearance of new inventions, today it is no longer viable to talk of a digital culture, but to affirm that our culture is digital. As an invisible layer that extends across the globe, we share a common culture based on our daily experiences with the devices we use and the services to which we subscribe online. The daily use of these resources creates new customs, new needs which, in turn, call for the creation of new devices and applications. In this continuing series of interdependencies, digital media becomes so common that we cannot affirm that it generates experiences beyond our everyday reality, but that is part of it. As Clay Shirky indicates, in reference to social networks [7], there is not a digital world separated from the real world. Therefore (returning to the example of the novel by William Gibson), there is no longer a cyberspace to plug into the brain, but it has become already part of our environment.

Claiming that our culture is digital, however, raises many questions and concerns: What consequences can have the progressive integration of new technologies in our daily lives? Note that not everything that is provided by digital tools is positive: There’s the loss of privacy that foster social networks, the progressive loss of interpersonal relationships face to face with the exchange of text messages, or the consequences of environmental mass consumption of technological devices. Digital culture has also negative aspects that sometimes call for disconnection and invite to serious reflection.

In the aspect of human relations, digital culture can be a culture of long-distance relationships, the “shared solitude”, as described by Sherry Turkle, who says that we are in a “robotic moment” [8]. And there, we as individuals, are increasingly willing to cast our feelings, not in other people or living things, but on machines that simulate an emotional connection with us. In the development of modern society, next to the possibilities that social networks and Web 2.0 tools open to create new forms of collective organization, we find the opposing forms of control and surveillance that those same tools offer to governments and large corporations.

All this is part of a world in which more than two billion Internet users are only 32.7% of the world population [9], and the actual scope of digital media, despite being very deep, is geographically limited. Recalling the words of Howard Rheingold, at the beginning of this text, we are certainly in a time when new technologies are transforming our culture, our society and even our way of thinking. It is therefore a good time to think about the effects and find the way to bring a positive global change. As stated by Rheingold, digital tools “can and do bring amazing solutions to problems. And, therefore, we expect incredible changes “[10].

 

Pau Waelder

October, 2012

————————-

[1] Howard Rheingold (2012) Mind Amplifier: Can Our Digital Tools Make Us Smarter?. Nueva York: TED Books.

[2] Charlie Gere (2010). «Algunas reflexiones sobre la cultura digital». En: Pau ALSINA (coord.). «De la digitalización de la cultura a la cultura digital» [dossier en línea]. Digithum. N.º 12. UOC. [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012] ISSN 1575-2275.

[3] Charlie Gere (2002) Digital Culture. Londres: Reaktion Books, 12.

[4] Pau Alsina (2010). «De la digitalización de la cultura a la cultura digital» [dossier en línea]. Digithum. N.º 12. UOC. [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012]. ISSN 1575-2275.

[5] Charlie Gere (2002), 198.

[6] Clay Shirky (2008) Here Comes Everybody. The Power of Organizing Without Organizations. Nueva York: Penguin Books, 159-160.

[7] Clay Shirky (2010) Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age. Nueva York: Penguin Books.

[8] Sherry Turkle (2011). Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. Nueva York: Basic Books.

[9] Según los datos facilitados por Internet World Stats [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012].

[Texto para el catálogo del festival Art Futura 2012] 

En un texto publicado recientemente, Howard Rheingold propone la posibilidad de lograr una expansión de la inteligencia humana por medio de las herramientas digitales que empleamos comúnmente y sugiere que dichos dispositivos han transformado ya nuestra manera de pensar. Citando a Andy Clark, Rheingold afirma que somos “cyborgs natos” en cuanto este término no describe tan sólo la inserción de dispositivos tecnológicos en el cuerpo sino “las personas cuyos cerebros no están físicamente conectados a un ordenador (aún) pero cuyos sistemas nerviosos están (ya) adaptados […] a un tipo de «pensamiento» que sólo puede producirse por medio de los ordenadores” [1]. Estas palabras recuerdan sin duda al futuro de ciencia ficción descrito por William Gibson en su famosa novela Neuromante (1984) cuyo protagonista, el hacker Henry Dorsett Case, conecta su cerebro al ciberespacio por medio de un implante neuronal. Pero no es preciso evocar un futuro distópico para encontrar una fusión entre humano y máquina que se produce ya a nivel cognitivo y social.

Durante las últimas décadas, la rápida evolución de las nuevas tecnologías ha producido profundos cambios en nuestra sociedad a nivel global. La manera en la que vivimos, trabajamos, nos comunicamos y creamos nuestra imagen del mundo depende cada vez más de las herramientas digitales que usamos a diario. Estas herramientas no sólo nos proporcionan recursos antes inexistentes (información en tiempo real, entornos virtuales, comunicación instantánea y sin distancias), sino que determinan, a través de sus interfaces, el aspecto de un entorno al que le dedicamos la mayor parte de nuestras horas de vigilia. La manera en que estas nuevas formas de documentar nuestras experiencias, crear y comunicarnos se han difundido en las sociedades industrializadas y la rapidez con la que han pasado a formar parte de todas las esferas de nuestra vida cotidiana nos han llevado a una situación en la que, como indica Charlie Gere: “no hay ni puede haber un punto fuera de los medios desde el cual podamos tener una perspectiva privilegiada y libre de concepciones previas sobre cualquier aspecto de nuestra existencia, y menos aún sobre los medios mismos” [2]. Hace ya una década, Gere señalaba la creciente presencia de las nuevas tecnologías en la sociedad contemporánea y proponía, en base a esta observación, “la existencia de una cultura digital diferenciada, en la que el término digital puede designar un estilo de vida específico de un grupo o grupos de personas en un determinado período de la historia […] La digitalidad puede concebirse como un indicador de esta cultura puesto que comprende tanto los artefactos como los sistemas de significación y comunicación que más claramente diferencian nuestro estilo de vida contemporáneo de los anteriores” [3]. La influencia de los medios tecnológicos marca por tanto la existencia de una cultura digital, en tanto nuestra forma de comunicarnos, relacionarnos, consumir, crear y compartir productos culturales viene determinada por el uso de herramientas digitales, redes de datos y otros dispositivos.

El ritmo acelerado con el que se han producido los cambios que llevan a la identificación de una cultura digital sin duda plantea grandes dificultades para elaborar una reflexión clara acerca de la influencia de lo digital en la cultura y menos aún plantear sus consecuencias a largo plazo. Pero sin duda podemos constatar, como afirma Pau Alsina, que hemos pasado de la digitalización de la cultura a la cultura digital, es decir que no nos encontramos ya en el momento en que las manifestaciones de la cultura son traducidas a bits, sino que estas se producen ya en el marco que definen las herramientas digitales, no sólo como meras representaciones en una pantalla que sustituye al papel, sino como nuevas formas de creación, distribución y recepción de la cultura, en la que ya no se asigna un papel estático a productores y consumidores, sino que ambos se encuentran en una compleja red de influencias mutuas en la que se producen no pocas fricciones. La propia concepción de la cultura se transforma: como indica Alsina, “resulta apropiado pensar en la cultura como en un proceso dinámico y no como en una esencia inamovible que se debe defender. La cultura, entendida como sistema dinámico formado por flujos de informaciones, personas y productos, adopta formas diferentes que responden a modelos dinámicos de relación entre individuos, sociedades y territorios” [4]. Dentro de esta concepción de la cultura como un sistema de relaciones, sin duda debemos a las nuevas tecnologías la configuración de las maneras en que esta se manifiesta, pero al mismo tiempo cabe reconocer que es la propia cultura digital la que genera el uso de los nuevos dispositivos tecnológicos. Así, podemos afirmar con Charlie Gere que las nuevas tecnologías son un producto de la cultura digital [5]: las herramientas digitales introducen nuevas posibilidades, pero cuando marcan una auténtica diferencia es cuando su uso se hace tan cotidiano que resultan prácticamente invisibles. Clay Shirky señala al respecto que no son los dispositivos más innovadores los que introducen grandes cambios en la sociedad, sino las herramientas de uso común como el correo electrónico, los teléfonos móviles o los sitios web. Son, precisamente, aquellas herramientas que una gran parte de la población emplea en su vida diaria, y que han facilitado las movilizaciones masivas de la primavera árabe en 2010 o el movimiento 15-M en España desde 2011. “La revolución”, nos recuerda Shirky, “no se produce cuando la sociedad adopta nuevas tecnologías, sino que se produce cuando la sociedad adopta nuevos comportamientos” [6].

Cada vez más ubicua, a la vez que necesaria, la tecnología se ha vuelto invisible y se ha integrado de forma natural en nuestro paisaje cotidiano. Los ejemplos antes citados indican la paradójica situación actual, en la que los medios tecnológicos forman una parte indisoluble de nuestra cultura, a la vez que dejan ser relevantes en sí mismos. Al observar un vídeo en YouTube, nos centramos en su contenido pero a menudo obviamos los medios que hacen posible que llegue a nuestra pantalla, desde el ordenador personal, el servidor de la plataforma de vídeos y la red Internet a las herramientas que, por ejemplo, han permitido a un grupo de adolescentes realizar un cortometraje con unos efectos especiales que hace unos años sólo estaban al alcance de un gran estudio de cine. Si, en las últimas décadas del siglo XX, celebrábamos la creación de una nueva cultura en torno a lo digital, cargada de sueños utópicos y espoleada por la constante aparición de nuevos inventos, hoy en día no cabe ya hablar de una cultura digital sino afirmar que nuestra cultura es digital. Como una capa invisible que se extiende por todo el planeta, compartimos una misma cultura basada en nuestras experiencias diarias con los dispositivos que empleamos y los servicios a los que estamos suscritos en Internet. El uso cotidiano de estos recursos crea nuevas costumbres, nuevas necesidades que a su vez reclaman la creación de nuevos dispositivos y aplicaciones. En esta continua sucesión de interdependencias, los medios digitales se hacen tan cotidianos que ya no podemos afirmar que generen experiencias ajenas a nuestra realidad diaria, sino que forman parte de ella. Como indica Clay Shirky haciendo referencia a las redes sociales [7], ya no existe un mundo digital separado del mundo real. Es decir (volviendo al ejemplo de la novela de William Gibson), no hay ya un ciberespacio al que enchufar el cerebro, sino que éste ha pasado a formar parte de nuestro entorno.

Afirmar que nuestra cultura es digital, no obstante, plantea numerosas dudas y preocupaciones: ¿Qué consecuencias puede tener la progresiva integración de las nuevas tecnologías en nuestra vida cotidiana? Cabe señalar que no todo lo que nos aportan las herramientas digitales es positivo: ya sea la pérdida de la intimidad que fomentan las redes sociales, la progresiva pérdida de las relaciones interpersonales cara a cara en favor del intercambio de mensajes de texto, o las consecuencias medioambientales del consumo masivo de dispositivos tecnológicos, la cultura digital también presenta aspectos negativos que en ocasiones invitan a la desconexión y reclaman serias reflexiones. En el aspecto de las relaciones humanas, la cultura digital puede ser una cultura de la relación a distancia, la “soledad compartida”, como la describe Sherry Turkle, quien afirma que nos encontramos en un “momento robótico” [8], en el que como individuos estamos cada vez más dispuestos a depositar nuestros sentimientos no en otras personas o seres vivos, sino en máquinas que simulen una conexión emocional con nosotros. En el desarrollo de la sociedad actual, a las posibilidades que abren las redes sociales y las herramientas de la web 2.0 para crear nuevas formas de organización colectiva se oponen las formas de control y vigilancia que esas mismas herramientas facilitan a los gobiernos y las grandes corporaciones. Todo ello se enmarca en un planeta en el que los más de dos billones de usuarios de Internet son sólo un 32,7% de la población mundial [9], y el alcance real de los medios digitales, pese a ser muy profundo, es geográficamente limitado. Recordando las palabras del Howard Rheingold con las que iniciaba este texto, sin duda nos encontramos en un momento en el que las nuevas tecnologías están transformando nuestra cultura, nuestra sociedad e incluso nuestra manera de pensar. Es por tanto un buen momento para reflexionar acerca de los efectos que están produciendo y buscar la manera en que puedan generar cambios positivos a nivel global. Como afirma Rheingold, las herramientas digitales “aportan y pueden aportar increíbles soluciones a los problemas. Y, por tanto, nos esperan cambios increíbles” [10].

Pau Waelder

Octubre, 2012

————————-

[1] Howard Rheingold (2012) Mind Amplifier: Can Our Digital Tools Make Us Smarter?. Nueva York: TED Books.

[2] Charlie Gere (2010). «Algunas reflexiones sobre la cultura digital». En: Pau ALSINA (coord.). «De la digitalización de la cultura a la cultura digital» [dossier en línea]. Digithum. N.º 12. UOC. [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012] <http://digithum.uoc.edu/ojs/index.php/digithum/article/view/n12-gere/n12-gere-esp> ISSN 1575-2275.

[3] Charlie Gere (2002) Digital Culture. Londres: Reaktion Books, 12.

[4] Pau Alsina (2010). «De la digitalización de la cultura a la cultura digital» [dossier en línea]. Digithum. N.º 12. UOC. [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012]. <http://digithum.uoc.edu/ojs/index.php/digithum/article/view/n12-alsina/n12-de-la-digitalizacion-de-la-cultura-a-la-cultura-digital> ISSN 1575-2275.

[5] Charlie Gere (2002), 198.

[6] Clay Shirky (2008) Here Comes Everybody. The Power of Organizing Without Organizations. Nueva York: Penguin Books, 159-160.

[7] Clay Shirky (2010) Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age. Nueva York: Penguin Books.

[8] Sherry Turkle (2011). Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. Nueva York: Basic Books.

[9] Según los datos facilitados por Internet World Stats [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012]. <http://www.internetworldstats.com>

[Texto para el catálogo del festival Art Futura 2012] 

 

En un texto publicado recientemente, Howard Rheingold propone la posibilidad de lograr una expansión de la inteligencia humana por medio de las herramientas digitales que empleamos comúnmente y sugiere que dichos dispositivos han transformado ya nuestra manera de pensar. Citando a Andy Clark, Rheingold afirma que somos “cyborgs natos” en cuanto este término no describe tan sólo la inserción de dispositivos tecnológicos en el cuerpo sino “las personas cuyos cerebros no están físicamente conectados a un ordenador (aún) pero cuyos sistemas nerviosos están (ya) adaptados […] a un tipo de «pensamiento» que sólo puede producirse por medio de los ordenadores” [1]. Estas palabras recuerdan sin duda al futuro de ciencia ficción descrito por William Gibson en su famosa novela Neuromante (1984) cuyo protagonista, el hacker Henry Dorsett Case, conecta su cerebro al ciberespacio por medio de un implante neuronal. Pero no es preciso evocar un futuro distópico para encontrar una fusión entre humano y máquina que se produce ya a nivel cognitivo y social.

Durante las últimas décadas, la rápida evolución de las nuevas tecnologías ha producido profundos cambios en nuestra sociedad a nivel global. La manera en la que vivimos, trabajamos, nos comunicamos y creamos nuestra imagen del mundo depende cada vez más de las herramientas digitales que usamos a diario. Estas herramientas no sólo nos proporcionan recursos antes inexistentes (información en tiempo real, entornos virtuales, comunicación instantánea y sin distancias), sino que determinan, a través de sus interfaces, el aspecto de un entorno al que le dedicamos la mayor parte de nuestras horas de vigilia. La manera en que estas nuevas formas de documentar nuestras experiencias, crear y comunicarnos se han difundido en las sociedades industrializadas y la rapidez con la que han pasado a formar parte de todas las esferas de nuestra vida cotidiana nos han llevado a una situación en la que, como indica Charlie Gere: “no hay ni puede haber un punto fuera de los medios desde el cual podamos tener una perspectiva privilegiada y libre de concepciones previas sobre cualquier aspecto de nuestra existencia, y menos aún sobre los medios mismos” [2]. Hace ya una década, Gere señalaba la creciente presencia de las nuevas tecnologías en la sociedad contemporánea y proponía, en base a esta observación, “la existencia de una cultura digital diferenciada, en la que el término digital puede designar un estilo de vida específico de un grupo o grupos de personas en un determinado período de la historia […] La digitalidad puede concebirse como un indicador de esta cultura puesto que comprende tanto los artefactos como los sistemas de significación y comunicación que más claramente diferencian nuestro estilo de vida contemporáneo de los anteriores” [3]. La influencia de los medios tecnológicos marca por tanto la existencia de una cultura digital, en tanto nuestra forma de comunicarnos, relacionarnos, consumir, crear y compartir productos culturales viene determinada por el uso de herramientas digitales, redes de datos y otros dispositivos.

El ritmo acelerado con el que se han producido los cambios que llevan a la identificación de una cultura digital sin duda plantea grandes dificultades para elaborar una reflexión clara acerca de la influencia de lo digital en la cultura y menos aún plantear sus consecuencias a largo plazo. Pero sin duda podemos constatar, como afirma Pau Alsina, que hemos pasado de la digitalización de la cultura a la cultura digital, es decir que no nos encontramos ya en el momento en que las manifestaciones de la cultura son traducidas a bits, sino que estas se producen ya en el marco que definen las herramientas digitales, no sólo como meras representaciones en una pantalla que sustituye al papel, sino como nuevas formas de creación, distribución y recepción de la cultura, en la que ya no se asigna un papel estático a productores y consumidores, sino que ambos se encuentran en una compleja red de influencias mutuas en la que se producen no pocas fricciones. La propia concepción de la cultura se transforma: como indica Alsina, “resulta apropiado pensar en la cultura como en un proceso dinámico y no como en una esencia inamovible que se debe defender. La cultura, entendida como sistema dinámico formado por flujos de informaciones, personas y productos, adopta formas diferentes que responden a modelos dinámicos de relación entre individuos, sociedades y territorios” [4]. Dentro de esta concepción de la cultura como un sistema de relaciones, sin duda debemos a las nuevas tecnologías la configuración de las maneras en que esta se manifiesta, pero al mismo tiempo cabe reconocer que es la propia cultura digital la que genera el uso de los nuevos dispositivos tecnológicos. Así, podemos afirmar con Charlie Gere que las nuevas tecnologías son un producto de la cultura digital [5]: las herramientas digitales introducen nuevas posibilidades, pero cuando marcan una auténtica diferencia es cuando su uso se hace tan cotidiano que resultan prácticamente invisibles. Clay Shirky señala al respecto que no son los dispositivos más innovadores los que introducen grandes cambios en la sociedad, sino las herramientas de uso común como el correo electrónico, los teléfonos móviles o los sitios web. Son, precisamente, aquellas herramientas que una gran parte de la población emplea en su vida diaria, y que han facilitado las movilizaciones masivas de la primavera árabe en 2010 o el movimiento 15-M en España desde 2011. “La revolución”, nos recuerda Shirky, “no se produce cuando la sociedad adopta nuevas tecnologías, sino que se produce cuando la sociedad adopta nuevos comportamientos” [6].

Cada vez más ubicua, a la vez que necesaria, la tecnología se ha vuelto invisible y se ha integrado de forma natural en nuestro paisaje cotidiano. Los ejemplos antes citados indican la paradójica situación actual, en la que los medios tecnológicos forman una parte indisoluble de nuestra cultura, a la vez que dejan ser relevantes en sí mismos. Al observar un vídeo en YouTube, nos centramos en su contenido pero a menudo obviamos los medios que hacen posible que llegue a nuestra pantalla, desde el ordenador personal, el servidor de la plataforma de vídeos y la red Internet a las herramientas que, por ejemplo, han permitido a un grupo de adolescentes realizar un cortometraje con unos efectos especiales que hace unos años sólo estaban al alcance de un gran estudio de cine. Si, en las últimas décadas del siglo XX, celebrábamos la creación de una nueva cultura en torno a lo digital, cargada de sueños utópicos y espoleada por la constante aparición de nuevos inventos, hoy en día no cabe ya hablar de una cultura digital sino afirmar que nuestra cultura es digital. Como una capa invisible que se extiende por todo el planeta, compartimos una misma cultura basada en nuestras experiencias diarias con los dispositivos que empleamos y los servicios a los que estamos suscritos en Internet. El uso cotidiano de estos recursos crea nuevas costumbres, nuevas necesidades que a su vez reclaman la creación de nuevos dispositivos y aplicaciones. En esta continua sucesión de interdependencias, los medios digitales se hacen tan cotidianos que ya no podemos afirmar que generen experiencias ajenas a nuestra realidad diaria, sino que forman parte de ella. Como indica Clay Shirky haciendo referencia a las redes sociales [7], ya no existe un mundo digital separado del mundo real. Es decir (volviendo al ejemplo de la novela de William Gibson), no hay ya un ciberespacio al que enchufar el cerebro, sino que éste ha pasado a formar parte de nuestro entorno.

Afirmar que nuestra cultura es digital, no obstante, plantea numerosas dudas y preocupaciones: ¿Qué consecuencias puede tener la progresiva integración de las nuevas tecnologías en nuestra vida cotidiana? Cabe señalar que no todo lo que nos aportan las herramientas digitales es positivo: ya sea la pérdida de la intimidad que fomentan las redes sociales, la progresiva pérdida de las relaciones interpersonales cara a cara en favor del intercambio de mensajes de texto, o las consecuencias medioambientales del consumo masivo de dispositivos tecnológicos, la cultura digital también presenta aspectos negativos que en ocasiones invitan a la desconexión y reclaman serias reflexiones. En el aspecto de las relaciones humanas, la cultura digital puede ser una cultura de la relación a distancia, la “soledad compartida”, como la describe Sherry Turkle, quien afirma que nos encontramos en un “momento robótico” [8], en el que como individuos estamos cada vez más dispuestos a depositar nuestros sentimientos no en otras personas o seres vivos, sino en máquinas que simulen una conexión emocional con nosotros. En el desarrollo de la sociedad actual, a las posibilidades que abren las redes sociales y las herramientas de la web 2.0 para crear nuevas formas de organización colectiva se oponen las formas de control y vigilancia que esas mismas herramientas facilitan a los gobiernos y las grandes corporaciones. Todo ello se enmarca en un planeta en el que los más de dos billones de usuarios de Internet son sólo un 32,7% de la población mundial [9], y el alcance real de los medios digitales, pese a ser muy profundo, es geográficamente limitado. Recordando las palabras del Howard Rheingold con las que iniciaba este texto, sin duda nos encontramos en un momento en el que las nuevas tecnologías están transformando nuestra cultura, nuestra sociedad e incluso nuestra manera de pensar. Es por tanto un buen momento para reflexionar acerca de los efectos que están produciendo y buscar la manera en que puedan generar cambios positivos a nivel global. Como afirma Rheingold, las herramientas digitales “aportan y pueden aportar increíbles soluciones a los problemas. Y, por tanto, nos esperan cambios increíbles” [10].

Pau Waelder

Octubre, 2012

————————-

[1] Howard Rheingold (2012) Mind Amplifier: Can Our Digital Tools Make Us Smarter?. Nueva York: TED Books.

[2] Charlie Gere (2010). «Algunas reflexiones sobre la cultura digital». En: Pau ALSINA (coord.). «De la digitalización de la cultura a la cultura digital» [dossier en línea]. Digithum. N.º 12. UOC. [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012] ISSN 1575-2275.

[3] Charlie Gere (2002) Digital Culture. Londres: Reaktion Books, 12.

[4] Pau Alsina (2010). «De la digitalización de la cultura a la cultura digital» [dossier en línea]. Digithum. N.º 12. UOC. [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012]. ISSN 1575-2275.

[5] Charlie Gere (2002), 198.

[6] Clay Shirky (2008) Here Comes Everybody. The Power of Organizing Without Organizations. Nueva York: Penguin Books, 159-160.

[7] Clay Shirky (2010) Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age. Nueva York: Penguin Books.

[8] Sherry Turkle (2011). Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. Nueva York: Basic Books.

[9] Según los datos facilitados por Internet World Stats [Fecha de consulta: 1/10/2012].